WCTC I Building

WCTC I Building


I’m Nick, a tool and die
student here at WCTC.
Most of my classes are in the
I building where a good
majority of the labs for
manufacturing, automotive,
construction technology,
and mechanical
engineering are located.
In the welding metal fabrication
area, students use
simple and complex techniques
such as cutting and shaping to
fuse and join steel
or aluminum.
They start with gas metal arc
welding then move on to gas
tungsten arc or TIG welding
and flex cord arc welding.
In the metal fab side of the
shop, they learn to form metal
using a brake press, which
is controlled by a CNC or
Computer Numerical Controller.
WCTC has a retro Mini Hornet
they uses Phoenix software for
plasma cutting, a Mazak laser
cutting machine, and several
CNC robotic arm welders.
In the machine tool lab, first
year students use a variety of
machines to manufacture
projects they become
progressively more
challenging.
They’re also trained on the
set up, operation, and
programming of CNC turning
and machine centers.
In the tool and die lab, we
work on Haas CNC tool room
mills, surface grinders, and
both wire and ram electrical
discharge machines.
The Mitsubishi wire EDMs can
achieve an accuracy of
1/10,000 of a inch, which is
like splitting a human hair
likewise 30 times.
We use this equipment to build
progressive stamping dies and
multiple cavity plastic
injection mold.
Two computer labs support
the machine labs.
The software we use in the
labs includes Surfcam
SolidWorks AutoCAD, Millwrite
and Mastercam.
The best part of tool and die
is learning how to make
something from a blueprint
to the finished product.
When I graduate, I know I’ll
have the skills to immediately
step into a good job.
I’m Steph, an automotive
tech student.
My classes are also in the
I building but over
on the South end.
Automotive technologies is
concentrated in three areas,
Toyota T-TEN, GM-Asep and a
general automotive options.
In all three concentrations,
we work on engines, fuel
management, electronics,
transmissions, brakes, and
everything else that goes
into a vehicle.
We use Hunter computer systems
to be able to align the front
and rear suspension within
1/100 of an inch.
That’s like folding a piece
of typing paper in half.
Our goal is to get the car or
truck running at its peak
performance and keep it there
by making accurate
inspections, communicating the
correct diagnosis, and
delivering skilled
maintenance.
Vehicles brought into the bay
include brand new Toyota and
GM models, all the way
to vintage classics.
And we all work outside of WCTC
at a co-op, which only
adds to our experience.
A portion of our truck driving
student’s training happens in
the I building and some
happens out on the
road behind the wheel.
In the classroom they learn
trip planning, state laws,
inspections, and safety.
But the best part is their
practice driving in the
semi-truck simulator.
The instructor can program
different scenarios, like city
driving or snowing mountain
freeways, to test a student’s
skills before they’re
out on the road.
Technology plays a huge role in
fixing cars and trucks now.
I feel excited when I pop the
hood because I can find out
exactly what is wrong with the
car and fix it myself.
I like my program because it’s
all hands on and what I learn
in school I can apply
right to my job.

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