Volvo PCV system check, 850, V70, S70, and others – Auto Repair Series

Volvo PCV system check, 850, V70, S70, and others – Auto Repair Series


hi my name is Robert this video is designed to give you step-by-step detailed instructions on completing the task at hand visit my youtube channel and watch my disclaimer video and please like share and subscribe I hope you find the information looking for thank you very much for watching in this video I’m about to give you some information about one of the most neglected maintenance systems on the Volvo 5 cylinder and some of the other cars and that is the PCV system which is part of the emissions and it’s a breather system built in these Volvo cars now my recommendation is if you don’t have written proof that the system has been serviced go ahead and get it serviced because the cost of not getting it serviced is much higher than the cost of getting it serviced and making sure it’s in good shape the Volvo 850 s at 70s v 70s and many of the other five and some of the six-cylinder Volvo engines have a unique emission system called a PCV system which has a breather box and in this video I’m going to show you a quick test you can run to try to determine if your system is clogged or serviceable or in need of service okay on the Volvo 850 if you come down past the intake manifold and look on the side you can see a vacuum hose there it’s real common for that vacuum elbow to be torn or broken or have some kind of damage to it because it’s kind of out of sight out of mind thing and that’s where it’s located if you look down under the intake manifold which you can’t really see on this video but it is right there past those cables it’s what they call a breather box that’s kind of the heart of this PCV system now if any of your vacuum lines break any of the elbows tear any of them or ports in it get blocked it may throw an engine code make the car run lean or rich and the big deal about this system is if it gets blocked up it causes pressure to build in the motor now if this system gets blocked up and it allows pressure to build in the motor it’s going to try that blow that pressure off somewhere now what it typically does it’ll blow your rear cam sills behind your distributor cap over there where your camp sensor is it can blow your front cam sills which are located inside your timing belt cover and cause oil leaks there it can also blow the dreaded rear main seal which is the crank seal between your transmission and your motor if that seal gets pushed out and starts leaking if your transmission has to come down or your motor has to come out to replace that seal so that’s the $1100 repair for a $21 feel so you don’t want that to happen another thing it could do is push out the front crank seal which it almost never does so you want to make sure this system is serviceable and you want to get it serviced if you have no written proof that has been serviced again this system goes from this side of the intake under the intake manifold has vacuum lines and tubes that runs around this part of the motor and if your car is turbo it’ll actually have lines that run down to the back of where the turbo intake goes and you see a couple lines there so if there’s turbo it’ll have more hard we’re in lines Dennis non-turbo the turbo cars has what’s called a PTC valve back there at the base of the intake right before it goes into the turbo and the non turbo cars has what’s called a flame trap which is normally right here at your intake for your throttle body so you got one or the other when you’re dealing with this PCV system now the most common ways that people check this system to see if it’s clogged or need services they’ll start the car up allow the car to be warmed by either driving it around or whatever and while the car is running they take the oil dipstick and they pull the oil dipstick out about three or four inches if the car is running and the system is plugged up or primarily if that line going to that intake manifold over there it’s plugged up or broken it will allow smoke to come out of this dipstick tube while the car is running and idle I have seen so much pressure buildup in some of these cars that you’ll open the hood the dipstick will be pushed out a little bit and there will be oil on the top of the on the inside of the hood where the dipstick was pushed out and it actually was blowing oil out of that dipstick so when the car is running you can pull that distict see if it’s smoking that could be an indicator that this system is plugged and needs service another test that is commonly done that may be more accurate as people actually take the oil cap off of the motor they put a rubber glove over the oil filter the oil filler neck while the vehicles running they put a rubber band on it to keep it in place and if the glove blows up then the system is clogged in causing to build in that motor if this system is in good condition and it’s not plugged up sometimes it’ll suck the glove down a little bit or at least not inflate the glove so I’m going to go ahead and start the car in duties to test okay test number one the car is running your car is warm i’ma pull the dipstick out see if I see smoke okay I do not see smoke smoke would indicate get the system need service so I’m good there now when I bought this vehicle the system was plugged up so much that it wasn’t smoking which it was beyond the smoking point so that wasn’t a good test for me that’s about an 80% effective test now the second test is to remove the oil filler cap put a rubber glove over that hole and see if it blows up the club so let me pause the video and put the glove over there and it’d be good if I had a rubber band to hold the glove one okay as you can see I have the rubber glove over the hole and it is actually trying to suck the glove in if it was bad it would be trying to blow the glove up so I’m a revved up car up to about 1500 rpm and see if that glove changed I crank the engine up to about 2,000 rpm it actually sucks the glove and more so that’s telling me that my PVC system is creating a vacuum and not building pressure in my motor if you got any questions go ahead and post them that’s how you can test to see if the PVC system is good I’ve even seen people put a little glove finger or something like that over the oil dipstick with the dipstick totally pulled out so you can pull the dipstick all the way out and put a glove or a finger over top of that dipstick and see if it tries to blow the glove up that way so anyway I don’t have a rubber band to try that method but it doesn’t seem to be trying to push my glove up there it’s trying to suck it down there as well so I think my system is good hope you check yours out if you feel that this information was beneficial please like it and share it with your social media friends you can also subscribe to my channel so that you can get notifications of future videos that I post visit my channel I have all types of do-it-yourself videos there you can these questions here and I’ll try to respond to them as quick as possible you can also visit my website at robert spinner.com thanks again for watching


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