Stratasys — Automotive Engineering With 3D Printers

Stratasys — Automotive Engineering With 3D Printers


at Joe Gibbs Racing every day is race day starting Monday morning the team works against the clock to fix technical issues on each race car the deadline wednesday afternoon when the cars are shipped to next sunday’s races the problem is designing and machining new parts for a car can take on average 33 days or more using traditional methods but at Joe Gibbs they get it done in three days using a Fortis 3d production system our tires were getting too hot or blowing them at the track so that was the performance issues what we needed to do here was channel some air between the murder and the tire so and push some that hot air out that the braking was causing with his CAD software engineer Scott temple designed a more effective cooling duct to fit just above the brake rotor to quickly test his design Scott loaded the CAD data into the Joe Gibbs Fortis 3d production system which built an accurate concept model of the new duck he basically wonder programming computer get-go you know four hours later we have this part pick it right up no problem fart right out of it that some of the prototyping needs to do in the past we were doing to see you see shop and we would do that on on a milk run late some of those pieces would take a complete set of pictures and folding and those prototypes would take approximately a week where it’s a day we can do some of the conceptual prototyping in a rounded day and we can do that with the forest system after working through more iterations monday afternoon scott sent a design to the fortis system for an overnight build of a functional prototype so here we are over the make parts and order system bring it over to the car you can put us right up to the park made it against and see that you’re not going to clear the caliper so we’re able to take it up to the computer change the model a little bit put it back in the Florida system 10 hours later we had another part put right back on the car and see that it was going to work Scott corrected the clearance problem and produced a second prototype on the Florida system late Tuesday morning the new design fit perfectly but the team still had to build the actual air duct out of graphite composite fiber for this they use the 40 system to accelerate the manufacturing process and once we had a revision that we were happy with we created a solid in the out of the park in the forest system that we could then pull a composite bolt from like that two-piece mold that had a that was fenced so we could fall apart and then out of these pieces we developed an actual composite carbon fiber parts that could be used to do further track testing and get on to the race car on Wednesday morning the graphite composite fiber was laid up the final part cured in a vacuum bag in an oven until early afternoon if we use a low enough temperature resin we can actually use fdm materials as our whole because they’ll stand up is the temperature as well by late Wednesday afternoon the finished air duct was bolted on the race car which was quickly loaded into its hauler and transported to the next race will get we having a problem on a Sunday during the race we will will be able to get some data analyzed sometime Monday morning and we have to generally have a plan by Monday afternoon with pieces and parts to go to the racetrack you know on wednesday so in general it is about a two and a half day process in a lot of cases it would be very difficult to meet without a dedicated


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