Penn College Commencement: December 17, 2016

Penn College Commencement: December 17, 2016


– Seated in the auditorium today
are family and friends who
have in many different ways
supported these candidates
to reach the goal
represented by this ceremony,
and on the platform are the
college faculty and staff
who’ve motivated, encouraged,
and inspired these students
as they completed their coursework
and their college experience,
and before us are the
candidates for graduation
who’ve become good friends,
mentors, and colleagues
developing relationships
that will serve them well
as they move into the future together.
We join then as members of
an extended support network
to celebrate our involvement
with these candidates
and to witness their accomplishment,
and that celebration now begins.
Presiding over the December
commencement ceremony
is the President of the
Pennsylvania College of Technology,
Dr. Davie Jane Gilmour.
(audience applauds)
– Good morning everyone.
– [Audience] Good morning.
– Listen, after what we
drove through to get here,
let’s try that again.
Good morning, everyone!
– [Audience] Good morning!
– Thank you.
On behalf of the Pennsylvania
College of Technology
administration, faculty, and staff,
it’s my pleasure to welcome you
to the Community Art Center this morning
and our commencement ceremonies
for the Fall Class of 2016.
I look out into this theater
filled with so many smiles,
and we know during this time of year,
my remarks say encroaching winter
so I’m just gonna say during winter,
we keep our graduates
and our families often,
sometimes the weather keeps
graduates and families
from attending Commencement.
However, you are here
today and we’re here today
for this very special event,
and I want to thank you for joining us.
This is one of my most favorite events
as a college president.
We celebrate all that’s right in the world
on a day like today,
all the tomorrows that stretch before us
and before these young women and men
as they turn their hard work and talent
into an enriching and inspiring career.
That ever-changing world can indeed
be a frightening and depressing place.
This past year has brought near daily news
of tragedy and turmoil
within our cities and across the globe.
But this institution, now
more than 100 years strong,
has historically provided
the solid foundation for
success and stability
and an incredible weapon
against fear and insecurity
wherever they arise across the nation.
So today we gather and we do
so in happiness and solidarity
united by pride and by purpose
to launch this Class of 2016
into the open seas of a boundless future.
Not just in fair weather, but everyday,
these students need to know
that your accomplishments
are important to all of us
because you are important to all of us.
You have touched our lives
and the lives of one another
in ways that none of us
may yet fully appreciate.
Please know that your Penn College family
joins you and your other relatives
in rejoicing with your achievement.
You are now part of a proud
and comparably rare legacy,
the society of educated women and men
who will find the degrees
that work can open doors,
deliver opportunities, and
bless you with security,
most importantly, in
addition, to give you respect
and an opportunity for happiness.
We look forward to the
contributions that you will make
in the days and years to come,
and the future begins now.
I invite you to sit back,
get comfortable in these
beautiful surroundings,
and savor the joys of the season,
and of course, this
most memorable occasion.
Welcome to the Commencement for Fall 2016.
Now, this is when most people
would say, turn your phones off.
Make them be silent.
There’s decorum for today’s event.
This, however, is a College of Technology.
So I’m going to say,
please turn your phones on.
You could mute the ringers if you want.
That would help us.
But this is a time when we want you
to capture what happens today
through whatever social
media context you’d like.
We’re going to do that
all during the ceremony,
and you are welcome to join us.
So with those phones on,
I’m going to be the
first to take a picture
(audience laughs)
of the graduating class.
(audience applauds)
Hashtag PCTGrad, we’d like
to see memories about today
and find out what’s going on.
So enjoy the ceremony.
(audience applauds)
– I’d now like to introduce
Elliott Strickland, Chief
Student Affairs Officer.
– President Gilmour, Senator
Yaw, Provost Starkey,
distinguished faculty and staff,
family, friends, and most importantly,
the December 2016 graduating class,
it is my great pleasure this morning
to introduce your student
commencement speaker.
Caleb Cartmell has done more
in his two years at Penn College
that most students complete
in four years at other
colleges and universities.
Caleb came to Penn College
in the fall of 2014
after being homeschooled,
graduating with honors
from Pennsylvania
Leadership Charter School.
A Dean’s List student,
Caleb is incredibly active
with the Student Government Association
and the Penn College
Motorsports Association.
In PCMA, he has served as
treasurer and vice president.
In student government, Caleb
was elected as a senator
for the School of Transportation
and Natural Resources Technologies
and currently holds the
Executive Vice President role.
This past summer, Caleb helped orient
our entire freshmen class
through connections,
where he served as a link our
summer orientation leaders.
Caleb graduates today with an
Associate of Applied Science
in Automotive Technology with honors
and will return to campus in January
to complete his Bachelor of Science
in Automotive Technology Management.
It gives me great pleasure
to introduce your 2016
student commencement
speaker, Mr. Caleb Cartmell.
(audience applauds and cheers)
– I would first like to
thank Mr. Elliott Strickland
for that great introduction.
It is a great honor to be of chosen
as the student speaker for today.
I want to thank all of my
friends and family, God,
PCT faculty, staff, and administrators
that have supported me
through my time here.
I would also like to welcome
all members of the Penn College community,
other esteemed guests, friends and family,
and especially the Class of December 2016.
Some of you may or may not know me
as the guy that broke both of his arms
fall semester of 2014.
That’s right, both of them,
and in the same place, radial
head fractures on both sides.
I fell off of my bike.
No, not that kind of bike, my bicycle.
(audience laughs)
Some of you probably saw pictures
on the phone app called
Fade if you remember that.
My roommates made sure there
was no lack of pictures
of the guy with two broken arms
trying to eat at Capitol Eatery.
(clears throat) That semester,
I was taking Math 180.
I’m sure most of you who took that class
remember it very well.
My mom asked if I wanted to come home,
and I said, “No way, I’m not
starting this class over.
“I’m gonna finish it.”
I walked into my 8:00 a.m.
electrical class the next morning
and sporting two splints
and two arm slings.
After a lot of laughs and
hearing some questions
that I’ve heard probably a 100 times,
we determined that I would
have to drop out of automotive
until I healed.
I was worried how this
was going to affect me.
Would I be able to
finish my degree on time?
Will they let me stay on campus?
Over the next week, I spent my time
going from office to
office at Penn College.
Registrars, bursars, residence
life, the school office,
disability services, faculty
offices, you name it,
I had to go through the
automatic doors to get there.
Much to my relief, each
time I went to an office,
I was greeted with genuine
people ready to help me.
Everyone I dealt with was
very quick to offer their help
and try to make my life a little easier.
Some people asked me,
“Why not just drop out for a semester?”
Or said things like,
“There’s no way I would still
be here with two broken arms.”
Well, I believed that I
could survive this semester
even with two broken arms, and I did it.
As cliche as it sounds, you really can do
just about anything when
you put your mind to it.
I don’t recommend that any of you
ever break both of your arms,
but remember, especially when you think
there’s something that you can’t do,
remember that you survived college.
You made it through all the tests,
all of the late night studying,
all of the finals, all of the papers,
and you are sitting here today graduating.
One of the most helpful instructors
I’ve had at Penn College
has been Mr. Chris Van Stavoren,
Head of the Automotive Department.
He’s been my advisor and
also taught me a few classes.
Whenever I’ve asked him
for help with something,
his answer has almost always
been, “Anything for you.”
While he’s clearly being sarcastic,
he has always followed through
helping me and other students out.
He’s gone above and beyond
for me more than once,
and there are many other
people at Penn College
that regularly do the same.
We should all be very proud
to be graduating from a school
where we truly aren’t just another number,
but a student who is worth teaching,
that can learn, become
skilled, and make a difference.
My English 201 teacher, Dr. John Hruschka,
spent his last day of class
giving a speech to us about life.
I don’t remember the whole speech
just like you won’t
remember this entire speech,
but one of the things that he said
that has really stuck with me
is something that I would
like to pass on to you today.
Be a contributing member of society.
Most of us that are graduating
will hit the ground running.
Jobs are lined up,
apartments will be rented, houses bought,
and a new chapter of our lives will begin.
When you start that new job,
continue from that internship,
move into that new place,
remember that it’s up to you
to make the world around
you a better place.
Pick up that trash out on the street.
Help that person change their flat tire.
Greet that new neighbor.
Smile at the checkout clerk.
It’s the little things that
make the biggest difference,
and you have the power
to make that difference
every single day.
Contributing to society may look
a lot different for each one of you,
and I’m sure you can all think
of completely different ways to do it.
According to National
Student Clearinghouse,
only 55% of students that
started a degree in 2008
finished in six years.
You are that 55%.
According to census results,
around 40% of people in the United States
have a college degree.
You are now part of that 40%
According to the Huffington Post, 7%,
just 7% of the world’s
population hold a college degree.
You are now a part of that 7%.
Be the person that makes the difference,
no matter how small,
and always remember your
proud Penn College days.
Thank you.
(audience applauds)
– Ladies and gentlemen,
as many of you know,
the legal corporate body
of the Pennsylvania College of Technology
is its Board of Directors.
That’s the body that by our charter
is given the final responsibility
for the government’s welfare
and all other interests
pertaining to the college.
Though some responsibilities
are delegated,
ultimate authority rests with the board.
At this time, I would like to
call upon Senator Gene Yaw,
Chair of the Board of Directors,
to authorize the conferring
of degrees at this ceremony.
Senator Yaw.
(audience applauds)
– This is a very special
occasion for all of you.
The degrees being awarded
have come from hard work,
from the guidance and
wisdom of the faculty,
and from the strong support
from your family and friends.
On behalf of the Board of Directors,
I extend to all the graduates
our congratulations and best wishes.
And to all the supporting family members,
the faculty, and friends,
I extend our thanks for your support.
Now, I turn to my official duty.
Dr. Gilmour, by virtue of the authority
vested in the Board of Directors
of the Pennsylvania College of Technology,
I authorize you on behalf of the board
to confer on each of these candidates
the degree earned as certified
by the appropriate school dean.
– Will the candidates
for the Bachelor of
Science degree please rise?
Dr. Gilmour, upon the
recommendation of the faculty,
I’m pleased to inform you
that these women and men
have satisfactorily
completed the requirements
for the Bachelor of Science degree.
– By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Directors
of the Pennsylvania College of Technology,
I do hereby confer upon you
the Bachelor of Science
degrees that you have earned
with all of their rights and privileges
and with congratulations
from the Board of Directors,
the administration, and the faculty.
Congratulations.
(audience applauds and cheers)
– You may be seated.
Will the candidates for
all associate degrees
and certificates please rise?
Dr. Gilmour, upon the
recommendation of the faculty,
I’m pleased to inform you
that these men and women
have satisfactorily
completed the requirements
for their respective associate
degrees and certificates.
– Thank you.
By virtue of the authority vested in me
by the Board of Directors
of the Pennsylvania College of Technology,
I do hereby confer upon you
the associate degrees and
certificates that you have earned
with all of their rights and privileges
and with congratulations
from the Board of Directors,
the administration, and the faculty.
Congratulations.
(audience applauds and cheers)
Would you please remain standing,
and would the baccalaureate
graduates please rise?
Caleb, would you join me over here?
– [Announcer] Would all candidates rise?
– Ladies and gentlemen,
you entered this theater as sometime ago
as candidates for the
certificates and degrees
that you have now earned.
Just moments ago, it was my honor
to confer those degrees upon you.
As a symbol of your entry
into the world of educated women and men,
I ask you to join me
as I turn the tassel of
your class representative.
This symbolizes to the world
that you are now graduates
of the Pennsylvania College of Technology.
Congratulations.
(audience applauds and cheers)
You may be seated.
As individuals and institutions,
we all pass through clear
stages of development,
points in time when we grow in new roles
and new responsibilities.
This ceremony is a transition
event for all graduates.
Today, the Pennsylvania
College of Technology
will recognize individuals
with academic honors.
Outstanding academic achievement
will be recognized for all students.
Gold, silver, or white tassels, cords,
they will wear during these ceremonies
will identify them for you.
White for honors, silver for high honors,
and gold for highest honors
will identify these students.
Blue cords will signify
academic achievement
for certificate students,
and in addition, we are proud to recognize
the members of Phi Theta Kappa.
Their gold stoles and gold tassels
will help you identify them.
And we are also proud to recognize
the graduates of the
Alpha Chi Honor Society.
White stoles will identify these students.
We would now like to recognize
our veteran students,
identified by the red,
white, and blue cords.
We are asking students here
today in the graduating class,
if you are graduating and
you have served active duty
as well as currently serving
in any branch of the military,
would you please rise?
(audience cheers and applauds)
If you stay standing, I’d like
to tell everyone here today
a little bit about our veteran students.
We have two students here
who have been the recipient
of the Purple Heart,
two Bronze star,
31 Iraq campaign medals,
and 38 Afghanistan campaign medals.
We are very proud of our veterans.
(audience cheers and applauds)
You may be seated.
You know, one of the best
parts of commencement
are the wonderful stories
that we hear from graduates
and their family members,
and there’s really nothing more satisfying
than hearing about all
that you’ve experienced
and that all that you have accomplished.
And many times, we hear about
what you’re planning to do,
and that’s equally as exciting.
Through your stories,
we learn about strength
and success of our students
and therefore the strength
and success of Penn College.
I’d like to take a minute
to share one of our
success stories with you,
and it all started on a
Facebook post that read,
and I quote, “Mom and I
petitioned to graduate today.
“It’s such a special moment for me
“because I wouldn’t be where I am today
“if it wasn’t for her.
“And now that we get to
experience this together,
“I wouldn’t have it any
other way,” end quote.
Graduating today are
the mother daughter team
of Lori Pepperman and Marissa Ray.
Most mothers and daughters,
yes, congratulations.
(audience applauds and cheers)
Most mothers and daughters can say
they spend a lot of time together
and experienced a lot of things together,
but I bet they can’t do what
Laurie and Marissa have done.
They took their senior
capstone course together.
They were Wednesday night study partners,
and today they will walk across the stage
at their college graduation
together for that ceremony as well.
Lori is graduating
with her Bachelor of Science
degree in Management,
and Marissa, her Bachelor
of Science degree
in Business Management.
Lori and Marissa, we congratulate you
and wish you a well-deserved celebration
with your parents, your grandparents,
your siblings, and other family members
who have traveled here today.
I’m gonna invite you to
stand and be recognized
for your example of outstanding
support and perseverance
that you’ve demonstrated on your journey
to earn your degrees together.
(audience applauds and cheers)
At this time, Dr. Carolyn Strickland,
Vice President for Enrollment Management
and Associate Provost
and the respective school representatives
will present the
candidates for graduation.
Now, this is a time when you
all want to capture this moment
on whatever device you
have brought with you,
and we know that so we’re
going to just simply ask you
to keep the area in front of
the official photographer open.
Otherwise, you’re welcome
to come down front
at the appropriate time.
And with that, our presentation
of diplomas will begin.
Thank you.
(audience applauds)
– President Gilmour, I
present to the graduates
from the School of
Business and Hospitality.
– Jaclyn C. Gregg.
(audience applauds)
Christopher Scott Kasler.
Kassandra S. Sellinger.
Amanda Rose D’Apuzzo.
Stephenie Francine Everson.
Laura M. Ferrand.
Rebecka Marie Oakes.
Kayla Marie Peters.
Kasey Marie Powell.
Chyna M. Profeta.
Lauren A. Stehman.
(audience cheers)
Samantha Diane Hill.
Emily Kathryn Helmus.
Nathan Daniel Strouse.
(audience cheers)
Jordan P. Way.
Brittney D. McHugh.
Aaron D. Lachat.
(audience applauds)
Our mother daughter team
of Lori Elaine Pepperman
and Marissa Eileen Ray.
(audience cheers and applauds)
Jahmas B. Hamilton.
Elizabeth R. Hill.
Heather M. Bakley.
Jennifer Lynn Matthews.
Ryan Matthew Strickland.
Maria Noel Caruso.
Rachel Renee Miller.
– President Gilmour, I
present the graduates
from the School of Construction
and Design Technologies.
– Michael V. DiMartino.
Ryan T. Getley.
(audience cheers)
Charles M. Stankye IV.
Dustin James Onofre.
Brandon T. Kearney.
Joshua M. Kalinich.
(audience cheers)
Dexter G. Smith.
Joshua Adam Fellin.
Jonathan J. Kofskie.
Jason Q. Lucas.
Shane T. Maitland.
Garrett L. Woodring.
– President Gilmour, I’m
pleased to present the graduates
from the School of Health Sciences.
– Katie Lynn Ingle.
Nicolette Marie Petragnani.
Holli Elizabeth Styer.
Sylvia Brianne Bidelspach.
(audience cheers)
Hunter Mackenzie Button.
– [Audience Member] I love
you, Sylvia, I love you.
– Roberto Delgado.
Ashley Nicole Edmiston.
Colby Wren Haas.
Elizabeth A. Lanager.
Christina May McCall.
Katelyn Elizabeth McGowan.
Kylie Beth Temple.
Danielle N. Young.
Kelli S. Tyler.
Alicia Ann Brant.
Krysten Kay Breiner.
Abby Catherine Busch.
Chesnya Ioanna Cherelus.
(audience cheers)
Neil A. Ebert III.
Monica Ashlee Flexer.
Emily Beth Frymoyer.
Chad Ryan Guiswite.
Alexandra Renee Harriman.
Josalynn Marie Heichel.
Courtney Danielle Kaster.
Sarah Elizabeth King.
Brianna Mary Latovich.
Stephanie Jean Lorson.
Kelsey Jo Maneval.
Alexa Ann Miller.
Christina M. Mossman.
Kelsie Aileen Murray.
(audience cheers)
Ashley Morgan Otto.
Karissa Leigh Pearson.
Steven D. Robinette.
Danielle M. Schriebmaier.
Kacie Rae Smith.
Tiffanie Mae Snyder.
Alexandra Elizabeth Winther.
– President Gilmour, I
present the graduates
from the School of Industrial Computing
and Engineering Technology.
– Joseph M. Eak.
Jeremy W. Rennicks.
Eugene R. Markowski.
Kurtis L. Knouse.
Steven A. Eck.
Matthew John Stenglein.
Kevin E. Bowersox.
Jason A. Eberhart.
Jesse Coleman Hulien.
Ashley Ellen Hughes Mahaffey.
Collin J. Mikkelsen.
Scott Juan Valido.
Eric Lee Brewer.
Dane Michael Cessna.
Robert Paul Dorazio.
German H. Mendez.
Matthew Michael Bernick.
Chet A. Schwoyer Junior.
Derek N. Heinbaugh.
Ali S. Alkhazal.
Adrian Mundo.
Archie S. Downey IV.
Norman C. Sabin Junior.
(audience cheers)
Nathan M. Eckstein.
Jason Anthony Gillott.
Christopher D. Gramling.
Cody Alan Hrtyanski.
Michael Andrew Johnson.
Tyler D. McCoy.
(audience cheers)
Robert William Myers.
(audience cheers)
Nathan Daniel Sharkey.
David M. Belzer.
Joshua P. Boal.
Benjamin Robert Cleary.
John Delavan Esenwein.
Evan Scott Jones.
Zachary James Plank.
Justin Charles Zetwick.
Fahad A. Alhajri.
(audience cheers)
Mohammed Alshehri.
Rayid Alzarani.
Alexander M. Murcavage.
Taylor John Smith.
Brady Brett Taylor.
Sean T. Zettlemoyer.
Corey J. Clark.
Robert C. Girvin.
Mark Aaron Jackson.
David Allen Manikowski.
Luke David McFalls.
Mckenzie M. Miller.
Alexander James Muller.
Colt Dalton Robbins.
Aubin Ian Sevrin.
(audience cheers)
Erica Lynn Strittmatter.
(audience cheers)
Nathan M. Tate-McCann.
Johnathon Russ Bartley.
Bryce Andrew Binkley.
– President Gilmour, I
present the graduates
from the School of Science, Humanities,
and Visual Communications.
– Carrie A. Myers.
Blair Marie Pipher.
(audience cheers)
Corbin Patrick Snyder.
Natalie Joy Kruppenbacher.
Taliyah Ann Paris.
(audience cheers)
Marquis Malone Delgado.
Darlene S. Phillips.
– President Gilmour, I
present the graduates
from the School of Transportation
and Natural Resources Technologies.
– Colton James Deitz.
(audience cheers)
Silawat Kaewpijit.
Adrian Ian Matthews.
Nathan W. Mitchell.
Christopher Anthony Niski.
Nicholas J. Buonanno.
Zach Taylor Rankin.
Krishna Mohan Yadav.
Mitchell M. Parmelee.
Alexander Charles Rozon.
Brandon Patrick Conboy.
Gunner W. Detra.
Chad J. Johnson.
Justin Justice.
Ryan J. O’Boyle.
Bryce J. Smithmyer.
Austin Nathaniel Stoops.
Zachery John Van Winkle.
Ryan D. Watts.
Joshua Raymond Getz.
Cole Rider Stackhouse.
Brandon Alan Veneziano.
Bronsen James Kunz.
Dalton Robert Litzelman.
Vincent Michael Pellechia.
Kyle Nathaniel Johnson.
Madeline Marie Perkins.
And Caleb Earl Cartmell.
– Caleb, come back.
(laughs)
Thank you, Caleb.
And now you know why
it’s one of my favorite days of the year.
Your connection to Penn
College does not end today.
You are now members of the Penn
College Alumni Association,
and that’s the link between
you and your alma mater.
I encourage you to keep in contact
with the Alumni Relations Office.
You’ll hear from that office monthly
being the Alumni E-News
as well as on Facebook.
We really look forward to
welcoming you back on campus
and hearing about your success
and what you’ve done with
the degree that works
that you leave here with today.
In a few months, you’re going
to get a graduate survey.
That survey is really important to us
to know how you’re doing,
your employment status,
what you’re doing so we can keep track
of how successful our graduates are.
So I would encourage you
to complete that survey
when you get it.
Now, I know everybody’s
ready to go to lunch.
I’d like the record to
show it’s 12 o’clock.
(audience laughs)
That’s a little inside joke.
But I have the privilege of
being able to talk to you,
the graduates, for the last time today.
So for the next two minutes,
and I promise it won’t
be longer than that,
I’d like to pretend that
there’s nobody else here
but you and I, the graduates.
I used to take a speech
that was written for me
or I would write it at
the closing ceremony
of every graduation.
I started to add up the number
of graduations I’ve done,
and since 1977, I’ve been at Penn College,
and to be perfectly honest with you,
I needed more pencil and
paper than I had time for.
But a few years ago, somebody
walked across the stage,
and it struck me, and I threw
away those prepared remarks
and decided to speak from
my heart and my head.
Chairman Yaw said it was
the best speech I ever gave,
so I thought it was pretty good advice.
I should try that again.
So earlier this week, I had
lunch with a very dear friend,
and she told me a story,
and it’s been inspiring me ever since,
and therefore, it’s going
to inspire the remarks
I share with you today.
She was in Disney World a few days ago,
and she was in Epcot Center
doing the candlelight tour,
something I’ve never done
but I’ve heard about it,
happens at the holiday time.
Meredith Vieira was the
narrator that night,
and you walk from country to country
and there’s beautiful holiday
music and there’s a story told
as you walk through the Epcot Center.
And after the third country,
the microphone stopped.
Now this is Disney; that
doesn’t happen very much.
So the singer behind Meredith Vieira
handed them her microphone,
and the microphone also didn’t work.
Now, you, those of you in
Business and other schools
have studied Disney enough to know
that that’s a real
serious issue down there.
So there was this awkward
silence while they announced
please pause while we fix
this technical difficulty,
and we’ll get back to you.
So there are about 200
people in the crowd,
and there’s a little bit of rumbling,
and it’s this awkwardness
of, this is Disney.
This isn’t supposed to
happen and what do we do?
When a few people backed
from her in the crowd,
a man stood up.
He was not a Disney employee.
He was just in the crowd
for the candlelight walk.
He stood up,
and in a beautiful baritone voice
began singing Silent Night,
and in a few seconds, the entire crowd
started to come together and
sang the song Silent Night.
Now that could have been
a really awkward moment.
There could have been
grumbling and complaining,
words I wouldn’t use from the podium,
people unhappy that their special moment
had been interrupted.
But instead this man took a chance,
and he did something to bring
that group of people together.
And as the producer and Meredith Vieira
and the other singers turned
around, they were in awe
of what a simple human being had done.
So my challenge to the graduates today
is I want you to be that
person who stands up.
It may not be on the candlelight
tour in Epcot Center,
but it may be in a crowded room.
It may be on a street corner.
It may be in your place of work.
It may be in your community.
But as a Penn College graduate,
you’re equipped to be
the person to stand up
and calm the storm, create a new idea,
or make something special.
That’s what we think about all of you,
and that’s why we believe
in what you’re doing.
So as you go out in the world today,
I have two pieces of advice.
One extremely practical,
please be careful driving home.
And one that I really
believe from my heart,
please be the man to stand up
and make us, Penn College, proud.
Thank you.
(audience applauds)
– I invite those who are able to stand.
Gentlemen, remove your caps,
and for everyone to join in singing
the Penn College Alma Mater.
The words for the Alma Mater may be found
on page two of your program.
(audience chatters)
(sings Pennsylvania College
of Technology Alma Mater)

One Reply to “Penn College Commencement: December 17, 2016”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *