Penn College: Automotive Technology

Penn College: Automotive Technology


[ Music ]
>>Hello. My name is
Chris Van Stavoren,
the Automotive Department
Head here
at the Pennsylvania
College of Technology.
This represents one of
our labs, one of twelve,
we have specialty labs
with specialty automotive
instructors.
One of the greatest challenges
facing today’s technicians
as they enter the automotive
industry is staying up to date
with all the technology that’s
involved with modern cars.
This shop manual right
here represents the amount
of technology that was
in all Buicks in 1973.
Twenty five years later,
three service manuals
covered the information
for one car line, Buick,
one car, the Regal.
The information for a 2012,
2013 model year is so intensive
that we now put it online,
there’s so much information.
Technicians need to stay up to
date with all this technology
and that requires
lots of schooling,
here and after they
get into the industry.
[ Music ]
>>My name is Colin Williamson
and I’m the Dean of the School
of Transportation
Technology and I’ve been here
for twenty-five years.
As you can see behind me,
this building was just
renovated and expanded.
We spent nine million dollars
two years ago in the midst
of all the restructuring
of the car companies.
It was Penn College’s
commitment to stay
with its automotive program.
It’s one of our very
first programs started
around World War I.
The way we’ve been able
to keep on top of this is
with our partnerships that
you see with Ford and Honda,
our individual instruction
where students work in a lab
in small groups on
real world vehicles,
the individualized attention
from the faculty considering
they’re specialists
in their area including their
labs, the recruitment we do,
I go out personally
to talk to students.
I’ve made 31 visits last
year to high school classes
to tell them what
we’re really about
and that my goal is
that they graduate.
There’s several reasons I
think that the college has,
that we have a positive learning
experience for our students.
One of them would be,
as you can see, the lab.
The facilities are very good.
We’ve got excellent support
from our administration.
We just added this particular
shop a couple years ago.
Our students actually work
on live work vehicles here.
We actually do work
on customer cars.
That’s one thing that I think
the students really enjoy.
They realize the cars are going
to be going back out on the road
and they have to do
a good job on them.
They get a real life experience
here while they’re in some
of the second year classes.
>>[background noise]
My name is Paul Evans.
I am a second year
student in the chassis lab.
This week in class
I’m a shop manager
and that means I’m helping
to run the service desk
and every single person in this
class gets a chance to rotate
through the surface desk,
meanwhile all the rest
of the class is out
working on live cars.
>>Hi. My name is Chuck
Probst and I’m one
of the instructors here
in the Honda Pact program.
We do have the largest lab
dedicated to Honda Pact
in the nation at
12,000 square foot.
Our state of the art
facility was built in 2008.
Here at Penn College we find one
of the most challenging aspects
for our students is the
student’s ability to keep
up with all the changes in
technology, all the integration
of electronics in
various systems
with partnerships like Honda.
Our partnerships with the
other manufacturers allow us
to keep our students supplied
with up to date automobiles
so that after they leave here
they have all the skills they
need to stay current
in the industry.
>>Hi. I’m Chris Holly.
This is the automotive air
conditioning electrical lab
in the ATC building.
Inside this lab we have about
14 donated vehicles we use.
We have other cars
we use occasionally
that are also donated but
this is the cars we use most
of the time.
They’re from several
manufacturers, Chrysler,
Chevrolet, Ford, Honda,
Toyota and we even have
some older products
that have been donated that
we’re going to be using
in additional classes
that we’re going
to be implementing this spring,
some aftermarket type
performance classes,
dyno related classes,
we’ll be dynoing older cars
and we’ll be dynoing newer cars.
We’ll be doing an
AVA type testing
where we’ll do a test
on the component.
We’ll add the new
component and we’ll go back
to the original component
so we can see
if the testing actually
improved the performance
of the automobile.
We have older cars so we’ll
be able to do simple things
such as ignition timing, air
cleaner, element changes,
move up into ignition timing,
distributor timing, cam timing,
eventually move into
the eternal parts
of the engine and
the drive train.
We’re going to focus on OBDII
car and a pre-OBDII car,
actually a carbureted
automobile.
>>[background music]
We’ve had some
of the best technicians
in the country.
Over the last two
to three years,
BMW and Chrysler’s top techs
were graduates of ours.
The top ASE future tech
in the country was one
of our graduates a few
years ago, Collin Hoffard.
And we’ve won first and second
and third place in skills U.S.A.
over the last 10 years.
It’s just all a testament to
the quality of the student
and quality of instruction
that we do here
which I think sets
us apart plus some
of the elective things we do,
whether it’s an aftermarket,
whether it’s a trip to Milan,
Italy for the students,
just doing the things to
round out their education,
get them excited
about automotive.
[ Music ]


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