NASTF Road to Great Technicians Feature Presentation Spring 2017

NASTF Road to Great Technicians Feature Presentation Spring 2017


so without further ado we will move on and I would like to bring up Joe Saunders from Toyota who is the OEM co-chair for the Education Committee and as Jill is walking up here I’ll point out you’ll notice if you haven’t already is each committee has two co-chairs there is an oem co-chair and an independent industry co-chair and the Education Committee as as I said Jill Saunders the OE co-chair and Rob rel is the independent hello everybody I’m Jill Saunders from Toyota Zoe co-chair of Education Committee so I just like to go over with you what we’ve been working on over the last year there’s two projects so him education resources guidelines in the road to great destinations the education resource guidelines project we’ve kind of put to the back burner for now until we get the road to great definitions up and going it’s a project that we were working on trying there was a problem that independent trainers didn’t know who to contact at ease for help on training materials and so we’re working on putting together a list for that but I think this road to great technicians project will maybe help facilitate getting that up and going so many of you may know that at last year’s spring nap tests meeting the Education Committee presented the session building the roads to great technicians which took up most of the three-hour meeting last year in this presentation it became all the more apparent the challenges of finding qualified technicians was expected to become even greater especially as vehicle technology continues to grow and as more of our experienced technicians begin to retire our next generation of students aren’t as interested in fixing things especially as we push four-year colleges and universities to them this problem isn’t just specific to OE but independent research repair facilities as well so it’s an industry problem that we need to come together to help fix Marc saxenburg was quoted saying it is essential we figure out how to keep the pipeline of new students full and how to make them great technicians for a lifetime so over this past year discussions have continued making even more aware all the efforts in the industries that are working on this problem some of them are competing it has become apparent that there is a problem here that we can come and work together and try and bridge this gap we need to stop portraying technicians as grease monkeys and a position that folks just fall into because they have no other choice today’s technicians need to be trained educated and qualified to fix our our customers vehicle so it’s time that we stop discussing the problem but get to work and do something about it it’s time that we start actively working towards the solution and in the future presentation that you’re going to hear about in a few minutes you’ll hear some ideas that are currently in use and working that a training program could be modeled after for an independent repair we will also be discussing how we can recruit students and their parents at a middle and high school level to feed into these training programs and of course if you have some ideas and would love to hear them we would love that to encourage you to go to this website and join our committee to help us solve this problem and this year we’ve added quite a few members joining in our in our discussions so it’s been going been going really well so so with that we’re gonna get into our featured presentation the road the great technicians let’s get started so our vision follows the vision of the NASA television at a highly professional well resourced vehicle service industry driven by United diverse leaders dedicated to solving industry technician development issues there’s four main points that we’re focusing on first is the promotion of current industry programs and there’s too many to list them all on this slide but you can see some of them ase ayes make at a TMC and a sa ii focus that we have is to develop a comprehensive apprenticeship or intern program that has a standard you’ll probably know many of the OE programs has a in classroom training as well as an apprenticeship portion of their training where they go apply the series that they’ve learned and and put them to use to see how they work the third is working on the credentials project being able to track the technicians complete career which also goes into continuing education so having having a program that a student can start out in and become trained and then they have a certain level of certification but then as they continue on through their career they have a way that they can learn new technology in how to fix the cars with these new technologies and maybe even help them see a career path that they can take should they choose not to want to be a technician forever but how they can take that knowledge and continue to apply it so it seems that great careers in auto repair industry often occur by chance and not design I don’t know too many people that just say I want to be a technician and that’s what I’m gonna do we’ve heard heard stories a couple weeks ago one gentleman said that he figured he was going to be in a biker gang or in in prison and he ended up being a technician he just kind of fell into it so many many service industry professional careers begin with a limited career plan and and for some reason there’s not a there’s not a clear understanding of what the career opportunities might be for someone who wants to start out as a technician and as a result we’re not attracting the best and the brightest students and oftentimes shops are focused on hiring qualified talents not developing the talent and keeping it so if you don’t know where you’re going any road will take you there well here’s kind of a road map that we’ve developed so somebody can at a young age can see the possibilities of where they can go to starting out in a Kye s High School program and then taking that into a post-secondary education whether it be a OE training program or perhaps the aftermarket training program that structured that will present to you today where once they graduate from that they start out as the entry-level technician and then they continue their education through in-service trainings which could lead them to be maybe just a dealership technician maybe they continue up going through all the levels and they become a master diagnostic technician or they become the shop foreman or they move over to be a parts counter person or they want to become a shop owner or they want to go work at a manufacturer and become a quality engineer we have to do a better job of showing what a what a road path would look like for them so with that I’m going to bring up Rob and he’ll go over what we have today thanks Jim over Department steps I’m playing that night keep going for me mark saxenburg put this together complicated but but it kind of demonstrates the the fragmented nature of the of what our industry is today and we have a lot of the pieces that we need going forward to develop a good education system for for our automotive world but it’s very fragmented and a lot of the pieces aren’t well-known to all the different segments that are in the industry and I think the aftermarket probably knows the least most of them do not know that a TMC is naked and those various organizations even exist and they don’t utilize them either and so that’s one of the things we need to address another part of this to be able to do all this there’s a significant amount of marketing marketing work that needs to be done throughout the industry so that we all understand what’s available and how to utilize so for that in the past or up to now so far the manufacturers have provided a majority of the support especially for the various ASE programs like Jill was speaking to this the apprentice programs and so on and now we really need to get the aftermarket to step up and help with their part which is not just providing more programs which we have plenty of but providing more funding so that these programs can be better marketed and understood throughout the industry and to help develop some standards we need standards for the different levels of training even for the apprenticeship programs we have several great apprenticeship programs out there but we don’t really have a standard throughout the industry for for any of it so we need to develop that going forward for a positive vision for a career in the automotive service industry at AAS and post-secondary post-secondary level we’re going to paint a picture of the great career opportunities in the autumn in the automotive service education are that automotive service education built the foundation for and one of the things that the Jill was talking about that is probably the biggest issue is when kids come into this most of them think about just fixing cars or fixing trucks or whatever wherever they’re starting and there’s a lot more to it than that I think if you look at Toyota which has a pretty amazing program most everybody act Toyota has been through the technician training program all the way up through the president but there’s a huge amount of various careers that have come out of that the nice thing about it is they all know how to fix their own car but but you can be a service writer a manager a shop owner a dealer principle is there’s all kinds of different careers that can come out of this core knowledge and that’s one thing that we need to get across to the students and the parents that are looking at a possible career in the automotive world we want to emulate what the OEM technician development models have established for us for the aftermarket and the labor the labor pool that we share between the manufactures but mainly the dealers in the aftermarket are really the same people and the people often float back and forth between the two entities there and so it is one labor pool and I think the manufacturers have done most of the work on that but we need to get the aftermarket up to that level as well and so we need a standard that both can utilize whether they go to a community college or or any of the various dealer programs or or a trade school or that sort of thing we need certain levels of standards that all can all of them can achieve and utilize so we need a generic we need some generic programs like the eight the t-ten program and that sort of program again for all the technicians we need to establish work-study programs for the aftermarket technicians in partnership with aftermarket reparent entities and independent repair shops and the independent repair shops are really not active in any of this right now especially the smaller shops they’re busy trying to run their shops they’re not really paying attention to what’s going on in the industry and and we haven’t really helped them to pay attention all that much ASE and some of the other organizations have done some great work but clearly we need to do a lot more we need them involved with a yes and we need them involved with a TMC and the other programs that are out there so we want to create an aftermarket focused or we want to create aftermarket focused in-service curriculum to supported technician development hierarchy and establish skill level guidelines for growth and promotion so I think if they they understand what careers are available here’s what it takes education wise to get there here’s where you are every step along the way then I think will attract a little bit higher level talent into this industry which is pretty much what this slide talks about um at the repair facility level we need to embrace the human resource development models that encourage development of skills not just the ASE certifications but all of that and offer Pam benefit incentives that not only attract the best technicians but encourage their growth and increase in knowledge and utilize the local community college a ten type programs for the entry-level Tech’s and an in-service training so again it’s just standardizing what we already have and trying to make it universal throughout the industry so with that we’re going to have a discussion about those points and where we’re at nowadays and what we’d like to do so I think Marc saxenburg you’re going to lead us there correct all right thank you [Applause] so I would like to compliment dill and Rob on the fine job they did of articulating that message and yes I did build that eye chart although I didn’t start it out intending it to be an eye chart but clearly that’s what it is and it does build progressively so you can test your eyes in various stages along the way I’d like to introduce Chris Chesney senior director customer training for car quest he’s up here on the we called this the dieter yes he’s up here on stage with me and on the phone calling in this is a virtual interview for Trish serrator Trish can you hear us Wow imagine that the technology actually works Trish is the president of Nate F national automotive technician education foundation very important they serve a very important role in our industry and certainly are a kingpin in this this initiative that we’re talking about here the road to brake technicians and Rick Lester Rick are you there Addie I spoke too soon about the technology Rick hit that mute button please okay well we may have to work on getting getting Rick connected to us but we’re not going to let that hold us up we’ve developed a series of questions that are kind of associated with validating some of our assumptions about the road to grade technicians and to get us some perspective from you know from different facets of the industry you know certainly perish from her native perspective Rick Lester from his t10 perspective and you know developing technicians at the entry level for Toyota and and Chris in his role as essentially running a program that does many of the pieces of all of this and what we try what we want to try and do is when we’re all done with this demonstrate the fact that just about everything we need to build the road to great technicians is already there what we don’t have is the the standards is Rob put it or what I’ll call the structure around how we develop them and and essentially when we want to bring them to different levels and I think it’s particularly important to to note that when young folks are coming into this industry there’s nothing wrong with painting a picture of there being a you know they’re becoming a you know a shop owner a dealer principal going to work for a know ease to you know doing instructional design doing Quality Assurance Engineering being a service technology engineer all of these things are things that should be communicated right up front so we’re going to try and talk about or get some perspective on this from our interviewees so the first question there’s a lot of talk in our industry about a shortage of qualified technicians and the question is from your perspective is this shortage real or perceived and I’m going to start by directing that question to Chris okay so is this one can you hear me okay I want to make sure it’s real I would have volunteered three years ago that it probably wasn’t so real but today after speaking to hundreds and thousands of shop owners and technicians across the country and especially shop owners who battle the battle every day they’re struggling to not only retain technicians but to find those to fill the spaces of those leaving so yes it’s real and I’m going to pose that same question to Trish is the is the so-called shortage of qualified technicians real perceived in from your perspective and mark I’ll agree with Chris to a point or we say that there are a great number of students graduating from our programs nationwide but they’re not finding the correct fit into our industry so is the shortage the lack of bodies is it the lack of qualified individuals coming out of our schools that are ready to enter the workforce is it a disconnect between how we find them and what we do with them when we get them so maybe shortage isn’t the word we’re looking for maybe the word we’re really looking for is the ability to connect the right person with the right opportunity in our job and whether you call that a shortage or you call that something you know unemployment disconnect that’s kind of how I would phrase it now I will say that in the truck industry absolutely big shortage because our kids don’t even know that those jobs are available but I would also suggest that if there’s a true true shortage what we would call a supply and demand issue wages haven’t gone up considerably enough and the ability to get a car fixed and back to its owner timeline hasn’t stretched out – and people run out of time so I think there’s a lot of elements to the word shortage and it’s really good that we’re putting them all on the table to discuss here thanks Trish so maybe if they all just didn’t show up to work one day and brought the entire nation to its knees those wages with co-op huh when thought the interesting right yeah well okay next question here and did we get Rick Lester on the line yet excuse me I apologize mark yes you have me on the line no apologies necessary thank you very much for for being here this is Rick Lester the manager of Toyota’s t-ten program Rick did you hear the question the original question no I just came in when Trish was answering that okay so the question was there’s a lot of talk in the industry about a shortage of qualified technicians and from your perspective is this shortage real or is it perceived um I think it’s definitely real I think the magnitude of the problem at individual employers often is being impacted by their ability to retain the talent that they have so we’ve got a couple issues here we’ve got what appears to be too many people coming into the industry interested in being service technicians and/or willing to go through the process to be prepared to be a service technician and we have in some cases and I would argue in a lot of cases employers that aren’t placing enough value on the technicians that they have and providing them competitive pay and benefits packages to retain okay let me let me move on to the next question here the road to grade technicians is an effort to leverage the technician development model that’s currently being used by several OEMs by duplicating duplicating it in the aftermarket this includes using the existing AES schools the current Oh a partner post-secondary institutions and establishing a minimum curriculum guideline for entry-level and in service technicians the question and Rick I’ll address this to you first are you aware of any programs that are already doing this for the aftermarket well I’m aware that most community colleges that Toyota works with have what I you familiar Graham meaning that the program is not designed to deliver specific proprietary curricula provided by some partner whether it’s Toyota or GM or snap-on or Hunter or something like that so oh yes I think I think in general those programs are being used by the college system to try to address the needs of of the aftermarket I honestly couldn’t tell you whether or not they’re hitting the mark you would probably want to talk to some of some of the aftermarket employers to find out the answer to that question so I know that our partner up in in Seattle shoreline community Shoreline Community College actually has has a program that they built using government funds they call it the GST program after the the the old native Native standard accreditation standard that that I think has been particularly effective at least in that market and do you think that these programs would benefit if they had a similar type of a structure to them as the terms that we’ve been using you know if you want to equate t10 to an after market program the Toyota Technical Education Network this would be a ten the aftermarket Technical Education Network do you think an a-10 program would benefit if it followed a similar type of a structure and similar type of career level guidelines is as a t10 and Toyota’s in-service training I I think there’s definite value in looking at it but I also know from experience that there are some enormous challenges and trying to design something like that and from our experience from Toyota’s experience we’ve seen in a lot of challenges on that on the education side in adapting new standards specifically because of their funding streams and how they’re structured now when you look at a community college and how they how they fund what what happens at the Community College that can get real complicated if they can’t draw a draw a line between what you’re asking them for and how they fund their programs you start encountering a lot of challenges and getting getting getting the mission accomplished though so we have in the industry already native right eight deficits tended to provide us a base a base standard for what a college automotive program should do should deliver and produce an individual that is ready to go into the interest industry at the entry level whether that’s aftermarket or a we so you know I think another question is that to ask is whether Nate F is meeting its mission and whether Nate F is in enough places though there’s a you know Toyota uses Nate F as the initial foundation for all of our programs and it it does everything we needed to do to get us started with with a college partner but but we wanted to add more to it to make the program more rigorous to make it better aligned with Toyota and Lexus dealer skill needs and there’s a there was it was a long road to get to the point where we understand what understood what that gap was so for your for your a 10 initiative you know understanding the gap between what the colleges are now delivering who the aftermarket and what you want them to deliver the aftermarket is probably something you’re going to need to probably one of the first steps you’re gonna take ok thanks Rick Trish it sounds like Rick just threw the gauntlet down for you well you know Rick happens full disclosure here to be on the Native Board of Trustees so Rick was actually just giving me more work to do so thanks Rick I didn’t intend to be that way but a totally wonderful thing we need to spread the spread the gospel of nature how’s that absolutely Ricky Rick is so true with what Rick is saying is very true there are lots of there are many many post-secondary institutions that are teaching automotive technology many of them about roughly 600 are mate F accredited and they’re accredited at the master level so let’s recognize that that is a minimum standard and it might not be everything that the industry needs but the scroll doesn’t know that until the industry tells it now Rick and t10 and and GM with their ASEP program and the Ford Asset program any other proprietary programs have gone into those schools and said okay great we like what you’re doing with may test by this Rick said we need some more to make sure that those students are going to be employable in our dealerships it is it is certainly a challenge for the after market to get together and come up with those missing or enhanced tasks or requirements if you will on as Rick mentioned there’s some you know program up at shoreline and they’ve done that they’ve gotten their aftermarket partners together and said okay we want an a-10 and we want it to look like this but helping other post-secondary programs achieve that that’s what the industry will need to do and makeup stands ready to help you do that if you would want an enhanced or greater level after market accreditation program we would be happy to speak with the you know with you and work with the our aftermarket partners to achieve that so and if I if I may Margo I didn’t intend to throw throw of the monkey on the back of Trish and everything really what she said is spot-on this is this is the industry’s problem not Nate s problem you know local industry needs to be talking more to the educational community and explaining to them what they what they need and unfortunately many in the industry don’t know how to do that they don’t know to do that and that’s why I said you need to understand the gap and the way you understand the gap is to have that conversation and the conversation is not really with with Nate F it’s it’s with the school that you want to be able to draw people out of oh so I heard something from Trish that I found kind of interesting and that is the fact that I think it was up in Seattle you were talking about there are efforts to do something similar to what we’re talking about is that right Trish and and this is going back a number of years mark so I’m not sure what the status of that is you know like you know with the t10 programs that is above and beyond the Nate F requirements what we know we could totally get in touch with shoreline rec you may know the partners or the players and so yeah I believe I believe what what you’re referring to Trish is what they call their GST program I think you’re right so it’s still operational and so successful so let me take this question to the next level which is let’s just say for a moment that that that school that’s that shoreline rec Shoreline Community College let’s say that they will be able they were able to successfully implement this road to great technicians they took all the elements and they were doing it successfully up in that market they they had the cooperative shop owners they had you know they had the students coming into the program they had their their act together on apprenticeship programs and so on so effectively they would be piloting this this whole concept if somebody was successfully piloting the concept do you think it would make it easier to do some of the things that that both of you are just pointing out as challenges easier for whom easier for some of these other schools that don’t know what to do if you could show them an operating model that that you know the operating successfully inputting not just entry-level technicians into the marketplace but also giving local shops an opportunity to grow them into into higher skill levels in in other words the school was essentially serving the same type of role that you know a t10 or other similar OE program and that ohi’s technical training group is effectively doing with you know with franchise dealers today yeah yeah I think I believe the answer to your question is yes I mean educational community is always looking for ideas that they can replicate and most grant programs fund a lot of their activities and in the case of GST it was a it was a federal grant that allowed them to build it that Toyota supported it was you know it produced something that I’m sure if you approach them they’d be happy to show you what they’re doing and how they’re doing and how successfully okay so one of the things that that this group has talked about is establishing a pilot program and it sounds like maybe there might be some places out there that with a little bit of work could be successful pilots but let me let me move on and and Trish I’m going to ask you this next question can you give us a high-level description of the AES program and a brief history and some program statistics and I don’t know if your if you’ve got much of this information but what I’m interested in getting at is if an Aes school wanted to expand its role in to supporting aftermarket technician development for example partnering with organizations like Pep Boys Firestone’s good years etc could you describe could you describe that for me yeah yes that way so certainly a yes was started 20 years ago by jack smith who was trying to create a european apprentice model in the united states to support his his dealerships initially and then ultimately dealerships around the u.s. it could not work the way European apprenticeship models work because we don’t a have the same guild system and process here and tracking and we’re much more entrepreneurial and independent meaning that you know people don’t want to stick around for five years necessarily to achieve a full-blown apprenticeship model as it’s developed in Europe and with other requirements so they brought this idea here that we would introduce high school students to the world of work via an internship model and that worked really well for a while with the the Oh ease it was really great OE support and then of course the recession hit and you know the money dried up essentially so ase took over the management of the AEF model and its its purpose taking it on we were very clear with our OE partners and friends that because ASC is for all of the industry that a yes could no longer be just for the new car dealers and the dealership opportunities now the ugly little secret of all that was that it never really was a yes schools were placing students everywhere they could anyway but the focus and the funding were coming primarily from the vehicle manufacturers so today the way the AES model works very simply is we ask the school to commit to follow up procedures of introducing the student to the automotive service technology workforce space meaning we want them to have a good GPA we need people who can read and write and communicate we want them to go through a skills a personal skills development program such as one that skills USA offers we want them to have a job shadowing opportunity at a business whether it’s a new car dealership whether it’s a part store whether it’s a collision repair facility or an aftermarket independent repair facility and then ultimately the icing on the cake is to have a business again generic business independent dealership parts collision truck offer that student who has met all those criteria so we have some sense that that student has the interest and desire to enter our industry and isn’t just taking up space in that classroom because there’s no outs for on-the-go get him an internship opportunity so we are open and have been since it’s been part of ASC for the last seven years to have students go to work at any or have an internship at any business now the way that works is it’s a commitment from the local business and the school so this past year last school year we had over I believe 500 high schools want to be part of the AES model and that’s a commitment to track every student through all of those steps so that’s extra work on the instructor side arrange jobs shadowing opportunities and then place students in internships so we had 500 schools nationwide that were participating at the high school level we had over 15,000 students who in one shape or another participated in any one of those criteria again the SkillsUSA the job shadowing the drop side is getting them the internships out of all those students we were only able to offer or have our students craft students now a thousand internships now couple of things here to qualify that again we know that not every student in the program is going to go into the workforce secondly we know some students have other obligations that will not allow them to have an internship perhaps they have obligations at home that they need to attend to that they couldn’t go through an internship or maybe they are in participating in a sport or other activity but the internship is a 320 hour internship it can happen anytime from the junior summer point on through their senior year we have 10 field managers that work in various parts of the country so we have one in the Northeast one in Florida one in the Ohio one in the northwest one in Southern California Texas we have people who are out in the street trying to make connections between high schools and the local businesses for our current involved folks include people or businesses both aftermarket and are we as you mentioned Pep Boys Bridgestone Firestone Napa Car quests as well as all of the the vehicle manufacturers the hardest part is finding the business that’s willing to take the time and the energy to work with that instructor and support that student in that internship as I think Chris mentioned earlier or maybe Rick mentioned it’s it’s hard if it’s a small business they don’t have the time or the energy to be able to do that effectively so finding a way to help support that program is what the AES model is all about and what we’re trying to do we’ve got more kids then we have internships we have businesses that one internships how do we help everybody make those connections sounds like quite the challenge so okay I’m going to turn to Chris here and I’m going to ask him the question how would you see trying to engage more independent shops to to become a part of a program like this sure you leave the fund for me so Rick and Trish built it on the on the mark with respect to its industry that needs to get involved and the only way that’s gets solved it is offenders forgetten gets involved and it’s not those that are in this room or on the phone that I’m talking about it’s those that don’t know about what we’re doing it’s those that fight the fight every day that Rob alluded to that that are busy one single shop owner who is the chief cook and bottle washer and he has two to ten technicians and he just doesn’t know what to do first and and so it’s I think probably the biggest effort that we’re going to have in this in this road to grade technicians is is assisting them in doing just that and getting involved and and from my perspective that means showing them how and creating programs for those that that I do have influence over how to do this how to get involved it’s almost like creating how to grow your own technician in a box program that we nearly one by one or two by two go out and communicate to those shop owners exactly how they get involved with their local high school how they become a member of the Advisory Council how they challenge the instructor and the in the school to meet their needs how they set or create additional tasks that they need there students to perform when they come to work for them how they will help that school meet those task needs and have them do it in context with what they do every day rather than then leave the the instructor to their own designs of okay today you’re going to turn a brake rotor and change a rear light bulb and then tomorrow we’ll well lubricate the slides on a caliper and we’ll overhaul an alternator in it which none of that makes sense to the technician when he goes to work so how can we get industry involved to help provide context to the schools to provide support to the schools in the way of tools and and vehicles and the same thing that the OEMs fund and support on the OEM side needs to be done on the aftermarket side so I know that my primary focus today within my own organization of which rob has an equal role on another side of that organization we’re trying to influence our leadership and our executive team the value that this presents to not only our organizations but to our customers and it’s it’s at such a critical level that if we don’t do this if we don’t help our our customers become involved in the solution then we have no customers to sell product to at the end of the day so it’s we see it as a critical step and so how do we get industry to become involved where we’re going to have to lead them to the water with programs that help them become involved we can’t just expect them to become involved there are many anecdotal success stories around the country as similar to shoreline where those instructors who fight the fight every day do this for a very very little amount of money but care enough about the key that they drag the industry to the table and they get them involved we can’t count on that either because that’s dependent upon individual desire and individual initiative we have to as larger organizations create those paths for our customers and for industry to bring them to the table and support that industry-wide whether it’s for a competitor or for an internal program we have to you know again I’m famous for take your badge off leave it at the door and leave your agenda through or let’s solve this is industry but it’s going to be when you walk out of the room you’ve got to pick your badge up and then join the fight to make this happen so okay great insights thank you very much so one of the things you all might be wondering is what’s nastas role in all this is nasta going to roll up its sleeves or massdep’s members roll up their sleeves and solve this problem and the answer to that is no or at least not from my perspective my perspective is that Nesta fizz is the cat herder organization if you look at our mission statement essentially for this particular issue our job is to unite competent in diverse teams to solve this particular industry-wide problem which leads me into my follow up question in and again I’m going to give this one to you first Chris but I wouldn’t mind hearing from those of you on the phone either so can you envision a time when an after-market entity you know for example in a CA in a sa you know maybe it’s ASE maybe it’s Nate F maybe it’s many of those organizations working together but can you envision a time when one or more of those organizations will be able to successfully emulate an OEM style development program from soup to nuts and when I say that you know from you know painting the picture or that road when somebody comes into an a s program you know to develop developing them through their career in an independent or or dealer repair facility and on to bigger and better things well you have to support me brother here so I’m looking at Rob I don’t think the associations will have the ability to do that the Association serve their members they don’t have the funding to do it they don’t have the expertise to do it it’s not their place to do it however it’s their place to support those that will do it and those that will do it in my opinion are organizations that touch every shop owner every shop every repair facility in the country and that probably is going to be suppliers of some nature more than likely part suppliers number one simply because of the scale of the problem and the the enormous infrastructure that those groups have so I’m putting back on my badge and telling you that’s our goal and that’s our vision for the near future and the long-term is to help organizations like NASA to find the cat’s herd the cats design the cat Corral if you will and and create that framework of Education for those that want to be in the industry and those that are in the industry to be able to recognize the opportunities and know what the next step is to get to that level of success or level in the career that they want to get to but it’s it’s also creating that framework in such a way that leaves the opportunity for competition or a competitive opportunity for those that do have the expertise do have the bandwidth do have the funding to create curriculum to hang on that framework and the infrastructure to be able to go out and promote and support a large customer base in that effort so I don’t think it’s the association’s that start it I think the associations that support those suppliers who have the means to do that at the end of the day and just follow on to that do you think the associations may play some sort of a financial role there in other words helping fund some of this possibly from the perspective of promoting and marketing and making it and providing awareness and maybe scholarships and and doing some financial aid to those students that need help and in getting the ability or getting the ability to attend some of these programs it could also be from the perspective of working with government and legislators to supply grant funding for some of these efforts it’s so yes from that perspective I think they do play a huge role okay thank you moving on to the next question and Rick I’m going to address this question to you but it’s really more targeted at somebody who’s dealing with dealer in service but I’m guessing you shouldn’t have any trouble ask answering this question how do you ensure that that technicians at Toyota are keeping up to date with the latest vehicle technology well to your point that’s a little bit out of my sandbox but we got and we got in or we can we can hand him a beer yeah Adam kids could certainly speak up but you know I think our training organization does does an unbelievably good job of making sure that new model information is deployed to our tour dealers and that invest our technicians in a timely manner we have we have training centers all across the United States whose sole purpose is to provide in-service training to Toyota and Lexus dealerships I don’t know the number off the top of my head but I but I think it’s greater than 30 with our satellite locations oh um he’s shaking his village a priority rom yeah what was that I I said Adam is shaking his head yes so you must be right there okay so you know Adam should feel free to add to that any any points that he feels us but in if it gets okay and the others I want to bring you the mic okay or actually looks like skips going to bring you Mike see I figured we’d be able to recruit you if we yeah can you hear me there we go you’re absolutely right Rick we also have a very robust elearning system that we deploy to all of our dealers and we have what we call skill level guidelines we require them to meet certain we have deadlines in all of our training to make sure that all the technicians stay up to date with the newest training that we have and then our top level technicians we make it a point to bring them into the training centers at least once a year to keep them up to date on the latest that is technology great thank you very much I think that provides a pretty clear picture of the way at least one manufacturers doing it and I think most of them are probably following some sort of a similar model this is going to be more of a of a service readiness question and I’m going to I’m going to pose this question to Chris because he faces a lot of aftermarket technicians in his work so that step is all about resolving gaps looking at the industry in general do you think that the typical franchise dealer repair shop is more service ready than the typical top-tier top-tier independent shop well I would say they’re more service ready in a timely fashion there are many top-tier shops that are every bit as service ready as an OEM service dealer for very complex problems that come down the pipe but they tend to lag behind further behind and they need to be today but I think those top-tier shops are those shops that are involved with vocational education they’re involved with aftermarket Technical Education that is available they have education requirements of their people they have a career path that they’ve spelled out for their people so all of the things that we’ve been talking about to this point are implemented in in those top-tier shops so it’s not by accident that their service ready it’s by design to coin a term by somebody I respect so I would say that they’re probably on a fairly even keel once that product has been in the field for a couple of years but when something fresh and new presents itself to their front door I would say that the OEM service dealer tends to have a significant leg up because that’s the mission of the OEM training groups is to make sure that their teams are service ready before that vehicle arrives and most aftermarket even top-tier shops tend to react to that a challenge when the vehicle shows up it’s kind of alarm clock that goes off and says you need to get ready for this problem because it’s now it’s your front doors now your problem so I guess what I’m hearing then is that at least in terms of that tapped error after market situation goes they have to be self motivating for service readiness versus the relationship between the franchisor and in the OE perhaps there’s a requirement most of you service right okay Rick I’m going to pose this question to you but you may want Adam to answer this or actually I think I know the answer to this I do we have anybody in this audience that is involved in technical training from from another OE besides Toyota here’s the question and I think I know the answer for Toyota do you have a program that allows technicians to transfer their courses in other words they’re the the training that they’ve already received from another OE or another independent repair organization should they start up in your shop and in other words if they come in and they’re supposedly certified to be a master technician the question is you have a program that allows them to transfer their training credit to your organization and okay good so does everybody understand what that question is about you know that you really need a transport ability of skills but are those skills properly recognized from one organization to the next so that Tech’s aren’t forced to go through training unnecessarily okay good I’m glad to hear that that things are moving in that direction Trish I’m going to post this next question to you first do you see our industry getting to the point to where failure to develop aftermarket technicians in an organized and structured way will result in a significant shrinkage of the independent repair facility population absolutely and I’ll tell you there’s two reasons one of them has to do specifically with aftermarket involvement and I think we’ve all talked about Chris mentioned it specifically about how do we get the independent and the aftermarket individual to understand the constraints in which education operates under and support that and move that those individuals coming out of the program into the workforce secondarily we talked about a shortage of technicians ladies and gentlemen we are facing a shortage of instructors they’re graying faster than the technicians are they’re retiring faster than the technicians are and the the bad news is usually what happens in less industry is really involved if that produce that instructor retires that program closes so I can immediately see and maybe we’ve seen it in our industry itself a consolidation of businesses and repair facilities we’re going to start seeing a consolidation and a closure of automotive training programs if we don’t get out there and support them and maybe take a role in helping a young technician who wants to become an instructor do that it’s a big pay cut when you come out of the shop into the education wall and we’re going to need to figure out a way to support good young excited energetic individuals come into the instructional world of education and support them to have our young people so after market and and dealerships and and they always have a big role to play in supporting what’s going on in education today and what’s going to have to happen tomorrow to support new instructors so perhaps we also need a road to great technical instructors as well huh I would I would say that would be a very timely activity to undertake okay well yeah just this is Rick and I’ll I’ll just chime in say it’s the number one risk I usually take with any of my partner colleges I lose it a key instructor the program the program typically falters until we can find someone to replace it and there have been cases where the program has failed because of key personnel retiring or moving on to more lucrative work Tricia’s spot-on with there there’s definitely just a bigger problem on the instructor side as there is on finding people who are interested in becoming service technicians so if we start seeing shrinkage in the population of qualified irfs we start seeing shrinkage in part sales from CARQUEST and world pack to don’t we so is your management and I’m going to pose this question to Chris but I’m also going to ask Rob the same question does your management understand the the grave implications of I mean they must be some degree because they you know they pay you the big bucks to do this right that part you didn’t get right so they most certainly are aware of it our organization while the perception to the public is that it’s a retail organization is absolutely focused 100% on professional repair facilities and what we need to do to support them today and tomorrow and into the future and consolidation is a real issue it’s an issue with respect to the larger big-box stores as well as part stores and so forth you’re going to see that continue that’s not going to slow down you’re going to see a huge growth in medium-sized groups around the country that continue to grow because they have scale to be able to do that but at the end of the day whether they’re consolidated or not there’s still a certain amount of repair that needs to be done to the vehicles that are on the road those vehicles are lasting longer significantly longer there’s more repair opportunities than ever we may be selling to fewer account numbers or branded signs but we’ll be selling to as many technicians as ever if not more working on more vehicles with more opportunities every day so our goal is to support those that are still in place and fighting that fight every day no matter what brand they have on the on the door thank you Rob did you want to add something we get you Mike okay Mike is coming work oh yeah all right we’re good you know I think that the instructor point is very relevant because you get a lot of or what we have right now is certain individuals that are bright that work very hard and kind of uphold a particular organization and when they leave the whole thing collapses and I think that kind of goes back to the standards and I think if those individuals were working to help strengthen the standard throughout the industry for training not only would we get better training overall but it wouldn’t be such a dramatic effect when people come in and go out of that industry so we need to get is even though we’re all in competition nobody makes a lot of money in education so we do need to get together to help raise the standards overall and I think that will make it easier for the instructors to and an interesting point on a question earlier just to add is I do feel I don’t know what Chris says about this but from my perspective the independent shops that are specialized are very good at keeping up with a dealer level the dealers tend to be better because they see a lot of repetitive problems so they get really good at that the after market you know whether it be rat damage or whatever gets a wide variety of problems so they tend to be a little bit better at diagnostics and diagnostics in general are a little bit more important to them again I think getting the two together just makes for a stronger labor pool on a stronger hole great thanks Rob so this next question I’m going to I’m going to direct to all of our interviewees here and Rick I’m going to start with you do you think that highly skilled technicians get the respect they deserve from the motoring public from the motoring public yeah the people are cars fixed you know I’m not real sure I can speak on behalf of the motoring public yeah I I when I talk to people that aren’t in our industry they seem to be a little that’s not something that’s really on their radar screen they seem to defer defer those issues to whoever they’re taking their vehicle into whether it’s a dealership or independent repair facility but I think the bigger issue with regard to respect to technicians has to do with employers themselves you know we’ve got a we get a serious gap in this country a skills gap in this country and it’s not just with service technicians and it’s not just with instructors it’s across the board with the skills trade so you know the IRFs are not competing just competing with the OEMs for talent they’re competing with contractors and with plumbers and and any kind of the construction trades that you could think of because those who are inclined to go into the skilled trades have a huge number of options and the remainder of them are being old and high school and middle school that they’re not going to be successful unless they go to a four-year college program so that’s part of the reason why we have a skills gap in my opinion I think that I think that the the best intentions of our educators to lead young people into you know white-collar jobs has created a situation where we we have this this lack of information where nasteria description but probably a lot of the folks in the room are of my generation your generation mark where you know when we were young we were exposed to the industry in a way that most young people aren’t today and that would be true of most of the skilled trades so we’re so we’re really fighting a fight that not only affects us on the intake side of the equation on the need to have solid training options across the United States on the need to have employers working more closely with education but we’re also fighting the fight to keep the people who have already made that commitment to the industry and if you know for speak on behalf the OEM all one has to do is read in a DA’s workforce studies for the last couple of years and it’s patently obvious that new car dealerships don’t know how to retain young technicians there the highest number generationally of individuals coming into the into the industry of those the the highest number of those people are coming into the service side of the business but they represent disproportionately the highest number of individuals leading so I think I don’t think technicians are getting the respect they need and that they deserve having been one at one point in time in my life and I think that’s an issue that employers need to need to address and that’s something that’s very much in their control you know when you have a discussion with a with a dealer owner or the owner of a independent repair shop it’s very simple and very easy to tell tell whether or not they’re paying attention to this know when’s the last time the general manager has walked through the shop and said hello to that the technicians you know what kind of recognitions are they give to their reward performance to their reward continuing to gather additional credentials in the industry like ASD certifications so again I think I think there’s a definite problem here I think technicians who are probably the most valuable asset that any service facility has whether it’s IRF or om get get some of the poorest recognition for who they are and what they bring to the business thanks for that great answer for the sake of time here because we’re going to have to wrap things up I’m just going to ask a simple question of Trish and Chris do you guys agree with Rick’s assessment in terms of respect for Tech’s out there I should say respect for hi Lisa skilled technicians ladies first Trish you want to go for that first I would have to agree with Rick I think we have a combo problem here I think most people don’t think about technicians until they need to get their car serviced and then it becomes an inconvenience and an expense I think from the perspective of getting repairs done correctly and getting the cars on the road I think the track record has improved dramatically so I think people understand that this is this isn’t a you know a simple thing to repair these days I need somebody who understands what is wrong with it and that I can build a relationship with to maintain my car my family’s cars and the safety of the people who are who are in those so I think from that perspective it certainly improved can I prove that can I can I give you statistics that say that probably not I said that would be a personal opinion here based on talking you know with consumers and car owners in the country I would agree with Rick though I’m not sure our industry has stepped up and is appreciating our technicians as much as they should and to Chris’s point earlier it’s nobody in this room it’s all those other people out there who are still continuing to give our industry a bad name um but we you know we really do need to recognize that if we don’t pay our technicians well if we don’t improve the environment in which they work if we don’t have the career pathway that you all are talking about and what is out there for them to understand is a growth opportunity we’re not going to get the young people who are looking for that if they can’t make a living wage and get married and have a family and do all the things that we do and have done based on our our work and career pathways we’re just not going to they’re going to say no so I think we need to continue to educate consumers that car repair is complicated and you want a professional trained certified qualified individual doing it and for our employers we need to help them understand this isn’t yesterday’s workforce this is new people with new ideas and you need to treat them differently you need to take care of them and you need to look at your business and how it operates to support that so it leads me to believe that if we can’t respect ourselves how do we expect others to respect us Chris just to wrap that up and I agree with Rick and Trish the we work in an industry with no standards to say or in the case of a technician or a shop owner we have relatively few standards that’s what the road to grade technicians is trying to define is a is a set of standards that we can measure others against and with respect to technicians and providing them with the recognition that they deserve vehicle owners have their guy that fixes their car but at the end of the day there’s no way to measure that guy against my guy or your guy because there are no standards and so that the vision that that Rob placed and Jill placed up on the screen earlier of trying to create those that’s that set of standards and those opportunities in our industry for those that are coming into the industry until they retire creates a an ability to measure those technicians and against various things and against those standards at which point in time you can recognize them to that to that standard or those set of standards so I think all of this kind of plays itself out if we have some level playing field that both the OEMs and and the independent repair facility technicians can can be measured against well said thank you very much that kind of brings us to the end of our end out of our time allotment as you can see this is not going to be an easy problem to solve for the industry but I think as you can also see it’s a problem that we’re going to have to solve 21st century cars are going to require 24 century technicians meeting 21st century standards to fix them right to fix them right at all let alone to fix them right the first time and with things like autonomous vehicles and you know automated driver assist systems onboard the vehicles that require proper calibration you know proper installation to work properly we really going to have to do something that’s what the roads great technicians is all about so thank you all for for participating Rick and Trish really appreciate you taking the time to to sit in on this call and the checks in the mail well thanks for the opportunity to share yeah absolutely I really appreciate it and Chris thank you to you rob Jill Adam and anybody who have forgotten to mention thank you all very much I hope you felt like this was worth your time spent today thank you [Applause]


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