Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Centurion. Part 1

Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Centurion. Part 1


As the Western allies were assaulting the beaches of Normandy
in June of 1944, a new type of vehicle could be found driving around the fields of Surrey, near the Fighting Vehicle
Proving Establishment at Chobham. This vehicle was to set
the standard for Western tank design for years to come. It was Heavy Cruiser A.41, to be known as “Centurion”. The genesis for A41
dates back to October of 1943. The British concluded
that by this point, between domestic cruiser
manufacturing and the imports coming in
from the United States, that they could quit poncing around with half-arsed modifications
to extant equipment, and instead build a proper tank to modern specifications. Immediate needs would be met by the continued production
of Comet series, with its reasonable enough gun and incremental improvements
over the Cromwell. For the A41, though, they would throw out the rulebook, and start from scratch. The first rule they threw out
was the requirement that the tank
be transportable by rail. This was a legacy holdover
from the early war period when the technology of the time
was such that pretty much you needed to railhead a vehicle somewhere. However, it was thought that they could soon enough
develop a transport truck to transport the new tank. This became the Antar, and in the meantime, the new tank
should be reliable enough that if necessary it could get
to wherever it needed to go under its own power. The next requirement was that it be given
a large turret ring. Up until that point,
the British designers were faced with a choice. You could either put a powerful gun in a horrible turret design, such as Challenger or Firefly allowed, or you could put a moderate gun in an acceptable turret design,
such as Comet. By increasing the turret ring size to 74 inches vs, say,
Sherman’s 69 and a half, they made enough room that this tank
could comfortably take the full-power 17-pounder gun. Now, five inches
may not sound like very much, but it really does have
a large effect. Protection
against the German 8.8cm gun was mandatory, which resulted
in good sloped hull armor and a well-designed cast turret. After a little bit of mucking around
with a 20mm Polsten cannon (Polsten is an acronym,
Poland and Sten) in the Mk1 tank, they decided this was
pretty much a waste of space and subsequent marks
dispensed with the 20mm and you just had the coaxial 7.92 Besa. The next variant dispensed with the 17pounder
and replaced it with a 20 pounder. This was the Mk3, and it became
the defacto British production tank. The Mark 4 was a close support version, the Mk5 was basically a Mark 3 except they replaced the 7.92mm Besas with Browning .30 calibre machineguns. We are at the Australian museum
of armor and artillery in Cairns to have a gander at their Centurion. The first Centurion
arrived in Australia in 1951, but this was simply
a British Army vehicle for tropical trials. Australia was
the first foreign country to order Centurion in 1950, however the order
was diverted to Korea upon the onset of the Korean War, and given to the British Army. The first sixty Australian Centurions
finally did arrive in February of 1952. Over time 117 vehicles
would be delivered, 96 of them would be upgraded
to Mark 5/1 standard. The difference
between the various marks: The Mark 5/1 saw
the addition of hull armor, the Mark 5/2 saw the replacement of the 20pounder with the 105mm gun. If both modifications were applied, the vehicle became a Mark 6. As you can see,
this vehicle does not have the additional hull armor,
making it one of the few vehicles which never made it
from Mark 5 to Mark 5/1. We start the tour
at the front of the tank as always. As you can imagine with a vehicle
with a service life like centurion, there were a lot of variations
on the theme. When the vehicle
was first put into service it would have had a stowage bin for the driver’s winshield
on the top left, and spare track over on the right. A lot of photographs, particularly from Vietnam, you would see
two roadwheels mounted on the glacis instead. This particular vehicle
has obviously had those removed, we have a small splashboard,
and multiple headlights. Sometimes you could also find
just single headlights. One unique feature about this tank
you don’t often see on others is located more or less
at the front of the roof over the driver’s compartment, and that is the fillerport
for the drinking water tank. And doubtless,especially
in the Australian environment, a very well-received feature. Other than that,
not too much here. You have the towing lugs and I will draw attention to the rather simple method of attaching the idler wheel by bolts to the font of the hull. There are 108 track links per side, 24 inches wide,
5 ½ inch pitch, single pin. To check it you want
to neutral steer to gather all the slack
on the return run on the side you want to check. Once you’ve done that, you then make sure
that the droop or the sag between the two center rollers isn’t more than an inch
to an inch and a half. Now, obviously you can imagine
that if the side-skirting is attached to the tank,
you have to unbolt that and remove it
as well which is a little bit annoying. Actually adjusting
the track itself, though, is easier than most vehicles. All you have to do
is simply remove a retaining clip, or in this case,
there’s a little pinch bolt to loosen, and then you get your large wrench and screw backwards or forwards. Unlike a lot of the vehicles
I’ve been looking at recently, they’ve moved the screw
towards the end of the idler arm, not down at the fulcrum. Provides a lot more leverage,
makes it theoretically easier. However, there is
a bit of a design flaw. It was noticed
that on occasion after throwing track, the track could be so tensioned that they couldn’t break track, and they couldn’t even loosen the track due to the tension
being applied to the tensioning system. The solution here was to cut the track, either by use
of an oxy-acetylene torch, or by blowing charges. There would be two linear charges
per armored recovery vehicle. You would set the charges
and literally blow the track apart. It is actually
the longest sequence in the manual. It is the process
of how to do this complete with all sorts of safety warnings, and I do note that it specifies
that in the event of a misfire, the officer in charge is the one
who must take “The Long Walk”. And it does emphasise
in block capitals, “alone”. I was never very good
at that sort of thing myself, I had this terrible habit of
investigating bombs with my soldiers. I guess it kept them company,
but in hindsight it may not have been
the most sensible thing ever. The British have now abandoned the Christie suspension system, and gone with bogies
to save on the interior space. They are an improved Horstmann design. There are three coil springs
in each bogie. Two major ones to deal
with the bulk of the load, and an additional third one to take up that extra effort when the first two get compressed. Doubtless changing bogie springs was a task looked forward
to by all crewmen. Not all the bogies are the same. The lead and trail bogies have additional shock absorbers
in the system, they’re up behind this housing here. Roadwheels, obviously
mounted in pairs, two pairs per bogie, three bogies per side,
that’s 24 roadwheels per tank. Check ‘em every 250 miles. The entire system
will cross an 11-foot gap, and scale a 3-foot wall. As you move up on the side,
it’s all about the stowage. Lots of deep stowage bins
for all your pioneer tools, tank repair equipment,
and what have you. You have also
on the sides of the turret the characteristic
turret stowage as well, usually this is going to be
more for your personal gear. Further forward you can see
the smoke grenade launchers and towards the back all you can see is the tow cable
and one of the exhaust pipes. Just inboard of the exhaust pipe you can see one of the marker lights, lifting eye, and underneath this appendage you’re going to get
the usual assortment of towing pintle, towing lugs,clevices and the like. The appendage itself,
this marks the vehicle as a Mark 5 LR, LR standing for “Long Range”, we’ll talk about that
when we get onto the engine deck. This is much easier
without the side skirting in the way. So as you can see we’re now
on the engine deck of the tank, and to open it the louvres, you have to spin the turret
like in most tanks. Unfortunately, unlike most tanks, 90 degrees isn’t going
to cut it with this, because of the large stowage bins
on turrets sides, you have to go all the way around
to about the 5-o clock, and unfortunately it’s hot and I’m doing
the manual traverse thing. In the real world, of course, you’ll just put it in power mode
and spin around, it’s not all that bad,
only in the museum. We’ve opened up
the transmission compartment first, and underneath me
you can see the entire steering, transmission, braking system. All the linkages are mechanical, you can see the inputs here
for the steering, the brakes, the gearbox. Steering is performed
by use of the steering brakes, the inside pair
of the two sets of brakes, but unlike
earlier generations of tanks where the brake
would slow down a track, what this does is it stops
the relative slip inside the transmission itself. As a result, it is powered steering on a fixed radius,
and that depends on what gear you’re in. In first gear,
it’s about 16 feet, in fifth gear it’s about 140. Access to the clutch itself is through a panel
on the base of the tank, in the belly. You can also see that to access
the transmission compartment, we’ve had to lift up the radiators, and this is a similar design
you would have seen this as far back as the Matilda II infantry tank
of 1940. Just as I close up
the transmission housing I will point out the filler point
for the coolant, 33 gallons of coolant were required. These aren’t as heavy as some,
but they’re still not light. So this is the famous
Rolls Royce Meteor, the V12 1649 cubic inch plant, which, limited to 2,550 rpm
would crank out 650 horsepower. This is enough
to get the tank going along at a pretty reasonable clip,
21.5 mph forward, 7.4 in reverse,
which is much higher than most tanks of the time,
in fact, almost double the speed. The high reverse speed was specifically requested
by British tankers building on the experience from Italy
where in the constricted terrain, frequently the only way out of trouble
was to put her in reverse and go as fast as you could. Directly underneath me
is the charging set engine, in American terms
it’s the auxiliary motor, which you would run
just to keep the electrical systems in the tank operating,
the batteries charged, without using the fuel drain
of the main engine, and fuel was a problem. It used 80 octane or better, there are two fuel tanks
in the engine bay, one on the left,
one on the right, 59 and 62 gallons accordingly. Now, people keep asking me
why do give measurements in imperial, well, it’s because
that’s what the tank was designed with. I do a German tank
I’ll do it in metric. Internet is your friend
if you want conversions. Anyway, the 121 gallons,
according to the manual, will get you approximately
34 miles cross-country, 65 miles on road. This is absolutely pathetic,
especially when you bear in mind that refueling was done
by hand-held jerrycans. The British Army’s
Bulk Refuelling System didn’t enter service until 1975, you can imagine
how laborious a process filling up your fuel tank would be. The solution to this
was the monotrailer. This was a 200 gallon trailer, with a single pivoted wheel
at the rear. This basically extended
the length of the tank by half, was entirely unpopular
with the crew, and was eventually
removed from service, actually pretty quickly. It was replaced
by a 100 gallon external fuel tank mounted straight
onto the rear of the tank. That is the extended long range tank we have mounted
on this particular vehicle. So we’re going to close up now, start off with the cooling system
for the 14 gallons of engine oil, close up the louvres, spin the turret back to the front, and I’ll see you for part 2. This is going to be
one of those days, isn’t it? Lifting eyes… underneath, behind
this little extension here you’re going to have
the usual assortment of clouds. That was much better.
All right.

100 Replies to “Inside the Chieftain’s Hatch: Centurion. Part 1”

  1. My favorite part of this is when he talks about how he would accompany his soldiers to investigate bombs just after he read a WWII manual that says in giant letters to do it alone lol!

  2. Years ago, I had the chance to visit the Bovington tank museum and they had a Centurion tank cut in half so you could see the left and right halves; the halves were populated with dummy crewmen and even though the Centurion was said to have been design to be more roomier than previous tanks, it still looked incredibly cramp. I truly pity the tank crew of the older generation tanks because it must had been incredibly claustrophobic.

  3. Weren't the IDF tanks in the 6-Day War really just souped up Centurions? Or did the Israelis reverse engineer one and make their own?

  4. Horstmann suspension. All modern tanks suspension system are a form of derivatives of this. BTW, Horstmann are still in business. I have one of these on my wall:
    https://cdn.plumbnation.co.uk/site/horstmann-thermoplus-as1-programmable-room-thermostat/large-prt1.jpg

  5. Even the names important …in the Roman army the centurion in charge of 80 men lead by example ..highly aggressive and a skilled fighter a centurion was a real bastard …the centurion tank pretty much copied the Roman infantry example !!

  6. Oi, its like ordering a pizza with this tank with all the different Mark designations… Also, I can only imagine the event that must have occured to have "ALONE" emphasized emphatically. Also cant help but notice how nice and shiny all the tanks look around this centurion yet this poor tank got rust all over, wth!

  7. Cool. i was at this museum on the 22nd of April 2017. I'm happy about this because I'm always sad that I can't go to other tank museums in England for example for cheap, as i live in Australia.

  8. It's such a shame the Centurion wasn't ready for Normandy, what a shock that would have been for the German Tiger crews!

  9. One of the most effective HE rounds used from WWII on was High-Explosive Squash Head (HESH, called High-Explosive Plastic (HEP) by the US Army which also used it after WWII). It used a large base-fuzed, soft-nosed shell packed with C-4 plastic explosive and had enormous concussion effect, allowing it to be really effective against various fortifications. Against a solid plate of RHA-type steel up to about 1.2 times the projectile's diameter hit directly on its surface at up to a 60-degree angle (from right-angles), it could spall chunks of armor from the back of the plate that acted like solid shot penetrations, even with no hole in the plate. At up to about half-caliber armor, it could blow a hole big enough to crawl through into the armor, tearing lightly-armored vehicles apart (no joke!). However, if anything caused the warhead to detonate before it hit the main armor, the blast effect would occur, but the spalling effect would not, so vehicles with thicker armor were safe from penetration, though not from all of the other bad effects of the hit. Those large storage bins on the turret of the Centurion would stop the HESH armor-penetration penetration effects, which is probably why they were put there, even though no other nation used these in the same way.

  10. Please feature Hellsing and Dracula tanks too. As you have included in such a nice game to ruin the experience of real tanks

  11. these were still part of the USMC armor ID course in 2015 (might still be to this day) meaning that the USMC clearly believes that somebody we will fight will still be fielding these.

  12. I was going to watch this video because I love the series, but the music (repetitive and overbearing) started and my interest turned to revulsion.

  13. compulsive viewing, thanks Nicholas-saw these in action in Vietnam in 1970-formidable weapons-much preferred by the crews over the M113 APC, which was very vulnerable to enemy fire.
    Bovington have a very impressive collection of armour of course -including the "cut in half" Centurion, it can't have been pleasant in the hot humid climate of South East Asia inside one of these.
    As you would know canister shot was very effectively used in this theatre of war-not sure what it meant for increased barrel wear though?
    thanks again for your well researched and interesting tutorials.

  14. You could do a series on Israeli armor. The "Super Sherman" vs the original, or some of the modified Israeli Half Tracks like the turreted M5 etc.
    That would be pretty interesting.

  15. That's sort of a MkV/1 (Australian) Centurion. It has the .50 cal ranging gun and .30 Cal Browning Co Ax, long range fuel tank but the front armour has not been upgraded. An Unusual beast! It probably never served in Vietnam due to the lack of the latter modification. There is great variation in Australian Centurions due to losses in Vietnam, and this could be a turret from a written off tank mated to a hull of a MkV, probably issued to a Reserve unit. The Australians also bought Cents from New Zealand and Hong Kong to be cannibalised to replace Vietnam casualties.

  16. These were really nice tanks, the British nailed it with this design in my opinion. Unlike its older siblings, the Churchill/Comet/etc. which were utter shite.

  17. As a 6 year old I bought a Dinky Toy Centurion from the money my Godmother gave for my first communion. Mom didn't like it for some reason.

  18. I dont know why so many people need subtitles to understand Nick, I can understand him clearly. Also, I find his accent very interesting. He's been in America long enough to get a almost half Irish/half American accent

  19. SAVE OUR CULTURE BY DOING OUR OWN DANCES. THE LIST OF MY EUROPEAN – POLISH DANCE BOOKS, ESSAYS AND VIDEO – ESSAYS ARE:

    A BEAUTIFUL POLONEZ – POLONAISE ILLUSTRATION; A BETTER VIDEO – COPY; AN INTRODUCTORY REMARK; AN EVALUATION OF OLD FILM POLONEZ-POLONAISE AND MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCES ON YOU TUBE; BAD BEHAVIOR IN A POLONEZ – POLONAISE; CHIVALRY AND GENTLEMANLY HONOR IN THE POLONAISE AND MAZUR; DANCES AND FOLKLORE OF ZYWIEC; KORZENIOWSKI; LONGEST POLONAISE ON FILM; MASS FORMATION DANCING; MONTE CRISTO POLONAISE; O HOW SPLENDID; OLD “HAŁKA” FILM POLONAISE ON “YOU TUBE” 2012; OLDEST POLONEZ ON FILM; POLONAISE ARMS; POLONAISE SEPARATIONS; POLONAISE STORY OF A DANCE; THAT BENDING POLONAISE; THAT ROCOCO-CLASSICAL POLONAISE RE-VISITED; THE POLONAISE IN EARLY 19TH CENTURY ENGLAND; THE SOCIAL BALLROOM POLONEZ – POLONAISE AND MAZUR – MAZURKA MAN — PRELIMINARIES; THE SOCIAL BALLROOM POLONEZ – POLONAISE AND MAZUR – MAZURKA WOMAN N — PRELIMINARIES; THREE POLONAISE PICTURES; TO THE READER ABOUT THE CD; TWO POLONAISE PICTURES; YOU TUBE POLONAISE AND MAZUR ON YOU TUBE; A BETTER HOLLYWOOD FILM THAN THE BOOK!; A LADY’S CURTSY AND A SURPRISE MAZURKA; A PROCESSIONAL POLONEZ; A GERMAN ANNA KARENINA; AN INTRODUCTORY REMARK; ANNA KARENINA PART TWO!; CHOPIN POLONAISE AUSTRIA; 1888 A GUIDE BOOK TO SAINT PETERSBURG; 1914 DATE CORRECTION RUSSIAN MAZURKA CLASS; A LADY’S CURTSY AND A SURPRISE MAZURKA; A LOOK AT THE ORIGINAL MESTENHAUSER; A SKETCHY SUMMARY STEP; A WONDERFUL DISCOVERY MAZUR; A MAZURKA DANCE MEMOIR; A SOVIET – RUSSIAN SUPPLEMENT FROM 1935; AN ASPECT OF THE 19TH CENTURY MAZURKA IN ENGLAND; ENDING A RUSSIAN MAZURKA; EXCERPTED NOTES FOR THE SLIDING; GERMAN MANUAL MAZURKA SOURCES; HOW TO USE THE AUDIO MAZUR WORKBOOK AND HOPEFULLY HAVE AN AESTHETIC ESTATIC EXPERIENCE; ITALIAN MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE MANUALS; MAZUR STEPS SOURCES WORKSHEET; MAZUR FIGURE PUZZLE; MAZUR THE ELEGANT…; MAZUR-MAZURKA THE BRILLANT DANCE; MESTENHAUSER'S UNBELIEVABLE TABLE OF CONTENTS; MESTENHAUSER'S POPULARITY…; MOJA PRZEPUSKA; NEW ENGLISH MAZURKA SOURCES 1830; ADOLF HITLER, GRETA GARBO, POLA NEGRI, AND THE MAZURKA DANCE; ALEXANDRA PILSUDSKA AND POLISH DANCES; AN INTERESTING HUNGARIAN DANCE NOTE; AN OPEN LETTER CONCERNING THE OFFICIAL MAZUR FIGURES OF BY THE TANCE POLSKIE DIVISON OF CIOFF; ANOTHER REGRET OF MINE; CWIEKA'S UNFINISHED BOOK REVIEW; KORZENIOWSKI; ONCE AGAIN; POLISH DANCE IN THE CONFEDERACY; POLISH DANCE AND THE POLISH GOVERNMENT–A NAIVE ATTEMPT; PRIDE AND PREJUDICE; THE “UGLY” HAND POSTION OR POSE FOR MEN; THE GENERAL CIRCLE FIGURE FOR THE MAZUR – MAZURKA; THE VERY SEXY ZOUK DANCE AND THE MAZURKA; THE AUSTRIAN EMPEROR, GALICIA AND THE KONTUSZ; WHAT WORD; WIENIAWĄ; WORKS CITED; ZPiT MAZOWSZE; DANCES AND FOLKLORE OF THE ZYWIEC TOWNSPEOPLE; GERMAN MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE MANUALS; ITALIAN MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE MANUALS; MAZUR THE ELEGANT POLISH RUNNING-SLIDING DANCE; MAZUR-MAZURKA THE BRILLIANT GLORIOUS DANCE; MISCELLANOUS; POLISH MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE MANUALS; RUSSIAN MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE MANUALS; SIMPLE ANALYSIS OF SOME PICTURES OF THE PZDP; SOME MORE MISCELLANOUS NOTES, FRAGMENTS, ETC. ABOUT THE SLIDING-GLIDING STEP FINALLY DONE 2007; SOME ORIGINAL POLISH SOURCES IN THE POLISH LANGUAGE; SOME ORIGINAL RUSSIAN SOURCES IN THE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE; SUPPLEMENTAL POLISH MAZUR-MAZURKA SOURCES; SUPPLEMENTAL RUSSIAN MAZUR-MAZURKA SOURCES; SUPPLEMENTAL AUSTRIAN MAZUR-MAZURKA SOURCES; SUPPLEMENTAL ENGLISH MAZUR-MAZURKA SOURCES; SUPPLEMENTAL FRENCH MAZUR-MAZURKA SOURCES; SUPPLEMENTAL GERMAN MAZUR-MAZURKA SOURCES; SUPPLEMENTAL HOLUBIEC COUPLE-TURN SOURCES; SWEDISH MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE MANUALS; THE ELEMENTS OF AND THEIR COMBINATION IN FIGURES FOR POLISH FIGURE DANCING; THE GORALSKI DANCE WORKBOOK; THE KRAKOWIAK DANCE WORKBOOK; THE KUJAWIAK DANCE WORKBOOK; THE MAZUR-MAZURKA DANCE FIGURES AUDIO INSTRUCTIONS WORKBOOK; THE OBEREK DANCE WORKBOOK; THE ZYWIECKIAN MAZUR; MAZUR THE ELEGANT…; HOW TO BEGIN THE SOCIAL BALLROOM MAZUR – MAZURKA; THE LOST GLINKA MAZURKA VIDEO PART II; ALL POLONEZ – POLONAISE VIDEOS AS ONE DOCUMENT; ALL MAZUR – MAZURKA VIDEOS IN ONE DOCUMENT; DOWNTON ABBEY AND WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN; PAS GLISSE ACTIONS.

    FOR EUROPEAN/ POLISH SOCIAL BALLROOM DANCES: POLONAISE AND MAZURKA ESSAYS, VIDEOS AND INSTRUCTIONS: GO TO THE INTERNET AND SEARCH FOR:

    ACADEMIA.EDU………..RAYMOND CWIEKA

    NOTICE !!! AS OF 9/1/2018 YUBE TUBE HAS REMOVED A NUMBER VIDEOS. HOPEFULLY THE VIDEOS WILL BE RETURNED SOME DAY!!

    TO VIEW THE VIDEOS PASTE THE VIDEO – WORD – ESSAY TO A WORD DOCUMENT AND THEN CLICK & PRESS THE CTRL KEY ON THE VIDEO.

    ORIGINALLY THERE WERE SOME 47 BOOKS .AND ESSAYS OF MINE BUT THE SITE OF ACADEMIA.EDU HAS SEEMED TO MISSPLACE MANY OF THEM SO YOU SHALL NOT BE ABLE TO VIEW THEM. AGAIN, HOPEFULLY THIS SITUATION WILL BE CORRECTED.

  20. u just forgot to say that te biggest user of this tanks and the place where it indeed saw tremendous action was in Middle-east with the IDF, ShAMEFULL MISTAKE not to mention IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  21. Just recently watched parts 1&2 of this fascinating series, especially regarding this tank. In the late 1970s I worked for a few months as a storeman/clerk at Puckapunyal Workshop Company, which was a "Field Repair Unit" conveniently located near the Armoured Centre so as to be able to service and repair the Centurions of the First Armoured Regiment and School of Armour of the Australian Army. It was about this time that the Centurions were being phased out of service to be replaced by the Leopard AS1. Indeed I was lucky enough to see the first of the Leopards arrive at PWC and what a shiny new toy it was! But back to the Cents…. Part of my job was to write up the log books of the tanks prior to being returned to their units, with of course the details of the repairs that were carried out. A number of the Cents needed engine changes, and this was no minor task, taking up to a week to complete in the workshops, and was something of an archaeological dig in itself: numerous items including tools and personal effects could be found in the sludge on the bottom of the engine compartment. I was told at the time that to replace the spark plugs for the Rolls Royce Meteor engines you had to basically lift the engine halfway out of the hull, but perhaps they were having a lend of me. Still, one thing I do remember very clearly from the log books of these tanks was the entry, "Request engine change – Reason for engine change, excessive oil consumption". Some of these beauties were burning 10 to 15 gallons of engine oil an hour, and the worst case I saw in my time there was 24 gallons an hour. Yes folks, that's GALLONS. This particular tank had traveled only 60 road miles since the previous engine change. The Leopard was a revelation: full power pack exchange in under half an hour, and this could be performed "in the field" with a trained crew and a crane truck or fitters track. Granted, the Centurion was reaching the end of it's useful life and better tanks were now available, but I still wonder at the durability of the Meteor, at least under Australian conditions. Just on the reliability and combat effectiveness of Aussie Centurions I would make note of the excellent book, "The Battle Of Coral: Vietnam Fire Support Bases Coral and Balmoral, May 1968" by Lex Macauley. He goes into some detail about the anxiety expressed by higher command in deploying these "Koalas" to a battle zone in Vietnam. ("Koalas" – not to be sent overseas, not to be shot at!).

  22. “Now 5 inches may not actually sound like very much, but it really does have a large effect” is my new favourite chat up line!

  23. I just don't get these Brits and there tank designs, so many predictable, design flaws. On this one it may not be the worst, but how can they design a tank with 30-60 mile range from the get go? Its not like they were unfamiliar with the meteor engine and its fuel requirements. Why especially in Post WW2 would you let a petrol powered tank that only holds 115+- gallons of fuel leave the drafting table in the first place? Not to mention the Jerry can refueling logistics. Mind boggling.

  24. if a diesel engine was available at the time of design would the it was it have been installation the centurion? and would of it have had better performance and range then a gas engine?

  25. i think the cetrurion was was the only good british design (proceed to fight in the replies section for the statement)

  26. The content of these videos is awesome. But the constant 'breaks' for every scene change get tedious really quick!

  27. My grandfather loved this tank. A Canadian tank commander who served in the M4A4 Sherman in Korea and many other models, but this was his favourite. He gave me the manual book for it.

  28. So changing the co-axial machine gun was enough to differentiate a mk.3 from a mk.5 but going from a 20 pdr to a 105mm gun only gets an extra "/2"?

  29. Fight a war against Italians. Call your tank after Romans as if you were larping as Fascists yourself and not in fact Judeo-masonic-gay-globalists. Britain no longer pretends to be White.

  30. Always known as "THE MIGHTY ANTAR" I've seen these things as a teenager and honestly they deserve the title. Huge machines with dozens of double wheels on multiple axles, and racks and racks of spare wheels. All the steelwork was not mild steel sheet but hugely thick cast iron. My brother when he worked for the MOD had a chance to drive one and said it was impossible and that it must take years to master this Beast. Changing gear with a "crash box" with a machine that would just grind to a halt if you didn't get it perfect, really scary.

  31. This 'review' is done in the style of that of a used car. Is it comfortable? What's the gear shift like? Lot's of LOL's, thanks.

  32. 5 inches may not sound like much… But it actually has a profound effect..

    I've been saying that my entire sex life!!! Lol

  33. So the pommy bastards took our tanks and then couldn't supply them until Korea was almost over. Good one Poms just like how you took the Turkish ships at the start of ww1 and caused them to join Germany well done Churchill you twot

  34. I stopped playing WOT but I am sincerely impressed by your work. If have any respect left somewhere for WOT it's the Chieftan's Hatch.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *