How To Tell What O2 Sensor To Replace p0135 p0136 p0137 p0138

How To Tell What O2 Sensor To Replace p0135 p0136 p0137 p0138


Flat Rate Mechanic hear again and we
want to do a video on how to find out
how to tell what o2 sensors to
replace on a lot of times you’ll get a
o2 sensor code like a p0135 p0136 p0137 or p0138 are a few of
the very common o2 sensor codes and
along with it it’s going to say Bank 1 o2 sensor or bank 2
o2 or bank 1 sensor 2, bank 2 sensor 1, bank 1 sensor 1, bank2 sensor 2 and so on and so
forth typically most four-cylinder
engines has two o2 sensors it’s going to
have a bank one o2 sensor and a bank 1
sensor 2 o2 sensor and basically what
that what you’re gonna have to do first
whether you have a 4 cylinder or a 6
cylinder you’re going to want to find
out your firing order and you could do
that just by typing in the engine size
and Google and asking it what your
engines firing order is and you can
usually find your engine size right
under the hood on this catalyst sticker
and you can see here this one is a 2.7
liter so I would just Google my type of
car with a 2.7l engine you’re looking for the
firing order once you know the firing
order you’ll be able to tell where bank
1 and ban 2 is now on a 4 cylinder bank 1 is
always just going to be that Bank of
that 4 cylinders on a six cylinder
you’re gonna have two banks so you’re
gonna have a bank here and a bank here
and on each bank is gonna be three
cylinders on an eight cylinder the same
thing there’s going to be a front bank
and a back bank 1 and a bank
2 and the way you’re going to tell
which one is bank 1 is wherever the
number one cylinder firing order is I
actually do up a diagram over here as
you can see on the 4 cylinder
engine cylinder 1 is here so this is
gonna be Bank 1 in the upstream o2
sensor is going to be sensor 1 the o2
sensor after the catalytic converter is
going to be sensor 2 so this is gonna be
this sensor is going to be bank 1 sensor
1 this one is going to be bank 1 sensor
2 now I got an 8 cylinder here which
would be the same as a 6 cylinder the
firing order is going to be on the right
bank you see this is a front-engine here
you’re gonna be looking at it from the
front so this would actually be
the left bank so the cylinder one is going to be
Bank 1 and then the other side is
going to be Bank – so this o2 sensor is
going to be bank 1 sensor 1 after
the cat’s gonna be bank 1 sensor 2 this
one’s going to be bank
2 sensor 1 and bank 2 sensor 2 sensor
2 is always going to be downstream after
the cat sensor one is always going to be
before the catalytic converter and
depending on whether you have a four
cylinder a six cylinder or a cylinder
that will depend on the bank one is
always going to be cylinder number one
so if you have a front-wheel drive
vehicle the engine is going to be facing
this way and the fan will be up here are
a rear wheel drive vehicle this is a
front-wheel drive vehicle if you have a
rear wheel drive vehicle motors the
front of the motor is going to be in the
front of the vehicle so if your cylinder
one over here this is gonna be Bank 1
if it so if it’s over here this will be
Bank 1 or vice versa so yeah bank 1
bank 2 on this particular vehicle it
would be Bank 1 Bank – I’m sorry bank
1 bank two on this particular vehicle
another way you can tell sometimes is if
you actually put a straight edge across
the front of the motor the cylinder one
showing there or if it’s always going to
stick out a little farther so you
sometimes if you can see your spark plug
wires if you draw a line straight across
the wire the stick is more forward is
going to be the bank one side so um
hopefully I get some clarity on how to
tell what to o2 sensor to replace yeah that
about does it for this video if you guys
have any questions or comments leave
them below out below or any other advice
you can add to this would be appreciated
but thanks for watching if this was helpful be
sure to hit the thumbs up button and
subscribe to the flat rate mechanic

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