How to Build a Homopolar Motor Using Neodymium Magnets

How to Build a Homopolar Motor Using Neodymium Magnets


54 Replies to “How to Build a Homopolar Motor Using Neodymium Magnets”

  1. I am so sorry but Andrea made that video and had more knowledge about that particular project. She moved back to the East Coast last year and is no longer working for us. My personal expertise is in jewelry making and design.

  2. You can get the magnets and the copper wire on Beadaholique . com's website. The links for the supplies in this video are located in the video description underneath this video.

  3. To see the price of the magnets click on the link for Neodymium Rare Earth Super Magnets located in the video description underneath this video.

  4. I am so sorry but Andrea made that video and had more knowledge about that particular project. She moved back to the East Coast last year and is no longer working for us. My personal expertise is in jewelry making and design.

  5. You can flip the battery to reverse directions or you can flip the magnet(s). Either way it would reverse the direction of the motor.

  6. Heavier gauge wire will keep it's shape easier but it's harder to bend. I usually use 14 gauge household wiring – either strip it or use the ground. But you have to use pliers to shape it. Gonna try smaller gauge next.

  7. by the way, you might want to mention that….
    when people start making this motor, they are probably going to make it in front of the computer watching your video, so be sure to keep those magnets away from your computer and any other storage devices.

  8. It works because the electricity running from the battery through the copper wire creates a magnetic field. This field interacts with the neodymiums field and causes the wire to spin.

  9. This is the new motor technology using magnet and electricity. this tech using less electricity but more power than normal motor

  10. A single AA battery doesn't have enough charge to electrocute(unless you tried to lick it) or heat up that strand of copper wire.

  11. Nice video. 🙂 It moves by pulling or pushing itself along the magnet(which the magnetic poles are facing along with the current) from the electromagnetic power caused by a short of the battery, so it spins. If you switch the magnet poles, it switches direction. The standard DC motors uses a commutator which switches the electromagnets everytime they align with the magnetic poles, so then it spins, that's how they work.

  12. I need a little motor to rock a small model ship back and forth like a teter toter…mudt be small, safe, and on/off switch…any ideas?

  13. so, does the wire touch the magnets to make the a connection to cause movement, or is it not suppose to touch the magnets?

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