How does this DEATH STAR speaker FLOAT!?

How does this DEATH STAR speaker FLOAT!?


I was sent the weirdest thing the other day,
a levitating Death Star speaker.
With the new Star Wars movie coming out, I
feel like now would be a good time to take
this thing apart, unbox it, and see what kind
of force it uses to levitate.
Let’s get started.
[Intro]
And peel off the top, and inside we probably
have some kind of instruction books, a little
bit of foam padding, and….oh boy…the Death
Star, the Bluetooth speaker inside of this
set.
And I think at the very bottom we have this
– this should be the base.
Whoa.
Got a little bit of a force there.
Here in the center it wants to pull the base
off to the side like that.
Okay, let’s see what happens.
I’m not sure what this thing is.
Maybe those instructions were important after
all.
“When you feel a strong force, which is
holding the Death Star from the base, this
position is the levitation point.
Release the speaker gently and take out the
floating stand vertically without any impact
on the Death Star.”
Okay, let’s try that out.
So I’m going to take both hands…trying to
find the floating point here in the center.
Oh boy.
I think I got it, I think I got it.
Nice.
Woo!
Okay, the Death Star is now levitating.
Come take a look at this.
It is spinning all by itself, and there is
nothing below it.
That’s pretty sweet.
List of available devices right here is the
Death Star.
We’ll go ahead and pair with that.
The only way to properly start off a Bluetooth
Star Wars speaker is with 10 hours of the
Cantina Band.
[Music playing]
That’s not bad!
I mean, it’s a small speaker so it’s not going
to have the big base of a big speaker, but
it’s pretty unique.
It’s not bad at all.
[More Star Wars music playing]
Alright, alright.
It’s very unique.
It’s a small Bluetooth speaker.
If you’re going to buy this, you’re going
to buy this because of Star Wars and not because
of the impeccable sound quality.
As far as like the levitation goes, it’s holding
itself pretty well in the air above anything.
So there’s nothing supporting it.
It’s rocking around a little bit.
I’m curious to see where the mounting points
are inside this thing – like where the force
is that’s holding it up.
And there’s only one way to do that.
Let’s take it apart.
Now destroying the Death Star is actually
a pretty big pain.
It’s almost like it’s not designed to come
apart.
There are no clasps that come undone.
Excessive force might be necessary.
After analyzing the construction, I have detected
a weakness in the battle station, but the
approach will not be easy.
I will maneuver my saw blade straight down
this trench, right between the power button
and this antique micro USB port.
Since the Death Star existed a long time ago
in a galaxy far far away, we can let the micro
USB slide for now, but any future Death Stars
will need to be equipped with USB-C.
These little metal windows can pop out once
the plastic surrounding them is cut.
You can see how strong the attracting magnetic
force is below the Death Star.
Finally, I was able to chop through a few
support channels which are about the size
of a small womp rat.
We get a glimpse of the main speaker at this
point.
It’s a small little guy, but it does get the
job done.
There are a few more screws holding down the
speaker to the base.
I’ll pop those out and continue onto the reactor
core.
The speaker has 3 connections: one for the
charging port, one for the power button, and
one for the black and red speaker wires themselves.
The circuit board has it’s own four screws.
I’ll take out those.
And finally the board and battery can come
loose from the super weapon.
The battery is about 1,000 milliamp hours.
The magical force that supports the Death
Star is, well, a magnet.
It’s big, circular, and very tightly glued
to the bottom plastic.
Pretty interesting.
And now it’s time to inspect the Empire’s
foundation.
This large circular platform is protected
by a thick rubber mat.
I imagine this is to keep the whole thing
from moving around.
There are 4 screws under that mat holding
the base together.
There has to be something super important
in here to help keep the Death Star stable.
The balancing free floating magnets is not
an easy task.
There are some interesting circuits inside
the base with 4 screws holding it all down
to the plastic.
After removing these, I can lift p the circuits
and flip over the whole contraption exposing
the electromagnets.
Electromagnetic levitation is complex, but
essentially provides a balance to the Force.
The large exterior circle you see is a magnet,
and the 4 circles in the center are the electromagnets
– usually oriented in the opposite directions
because opposite poles attract.
The magnet inside the Death Star is attracted
to the large circle shaped magnet, which makes
it kind of hard to place.
But the opposite oriented electromagnets are
doing the calculated repelling as needed,
turning off or on or adjusting the power to
keep the Death Star stable.
Remember, this base is plugged into the wall
and needs power to keep functioning.
Magnets aren’t going to float by themselves.
Pretty fun stuff, and a major thumbs up to
whoever designed this Death Star.
I’ll leave a link for this contraption in
the video description and now you won’t need
to take apart your speaker to find out how
it floats or how it works.
Hit that subscribe button if you haven’t already.
And come hang out with me on Instagram.
Thank you a ton for watching, and may the
Force be with you.

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