GSA Fleet Desktop Workshop: Electric Vehicles

GSA Fleet Desktop Workshop: Electric Vehicles


>>Ask questions then, and feel free to write
any questions in the Q&A box on your screen
as well, and we’ll either answer
them as we go or near the end.
So first, GSA’s Fleet Management
Value Proposition is the right vehicle
at the right price with great
service and the data required
to effectively and efficiently manage a fleet.
And so, that’s what we’re
going to go into today.
That’s our number one goal with
electric vehicles and charging stations.
So, here’s just a quick overview of the agenda.
We’ll start with the federal mandates
requiring fuel efficient vehicles,
specifically those surrounding electric
vehicles and zero emission vehicles.
We’ll go over the types of electric
vehicles that are available, the features
and considerations that you should keep in mind
when looking to implement electric vehicles
in your fleet, our FY16 offerings.
And then, we’ll go into charging stations and
go over the different types of charging stations
that you can choose from, what their
features are, what you should know
about them before ordering them, and
then some of our acquisition solutions.
So, as far as federal mandates,
there are three that apply to electric vehicles
and infrastructure in the federal fleet.
The first is Executive Order 13693, entitled
planning for sustainability in the next decade.
The second is the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and
2005, which is commonly referred to as EPAct.
And then, the 2010 guidance on section 141
of the Energy Independence and Security Act
of 2007, also referred to as EISA.
So we’ll start with Executive Order 13693.
It was signed by President Obama on March
19, 2015, and it sets ambitious standards
for the zero
emission vehicles in federal fleets.
It mandates that 20% of new fleet passenger
vehicle acquisitions be comprised of zero
and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
By 2025, that percentage jumps to 50% of new
light-duty passenger vehicle acquisitions.
In addition, agencies must reduce federal
fleet per mile greenhouse gas emissions
by 30% by 2025 based on 2014 baselines.
These reductions will be spread
out over the next nine years
through baselines set in the Executive Order.
In addition to emission reductions, the
Executive Order directs agencies to plan
for electric vehicle refueling
and infrastructure
that can capture and record vehicle level data.
It also directs agencies to collect
asset level data and properly
and accurately record fleet data in a
formal agency fleet management system.
The next one, the Energy
Independence and Security Act of 2007,
mandates that agencies acquire low
greenhouse gas emitting light duty vehicles
and low GHG emitting medium duty vehicles
that are designed to transport less
than 12 passengers, or less than nine
passengers rearward of the driver’s seat.
For model year 2016, the EPA set the low
greenhouse gas emitting threshold at a maximum
of 300 grams per mile of carbon
dioxide emissions for passenger cars
and 375 grams per mile of carbon
dioxide emission for light duty trucks.
Please note that this year there are
no longer separate ,
all vehicles are held to those two standards.
EPAct requires that 75% of
light duty vehicles acquired
in metropolitan statistical areas
to be alternative fuel vehicles.
Per the expanded definition of an AFV in
the Defense Authorization Act of 2008,
low greenhouse gasoline powered vehicles can
be considered AFV’s when they are not garaged
within five miles or 15 minutes
of an alternative fuel source.
So there are three types of electric
vehicle that we’ll talk about today,
and we want to distinguish between
them so you understand the difference.
A BEV, or better electric vehicle, is an
all electric or zero emissions vehicle
that is powered exclusively by a battery.
BEV’s must plug into an electrical
outlet for power.
Common types of electric vehicles that you
have probably heard of include the Tesla model,
Ford Focus, Saturn electric,
and the Nissan Leaf.
Better electric vehicles are synonymous with
zero emission vehicles and typically have ranges
between 70 and 100 miles, though
we’re seeing this start to increase.
PHEV, or plug-in hybrid electric
vehicle, is a vehicle propelled
by both an internal combustion
engine and an electric motor.
PHEV’s can operate exclusively on electric
power, anywhere between 19 and 53 miles,
but have the added benefit of
an internal combustion engine
that greatly extends the vehicle’s range.
PHEV’s have two fuel outlets, one that can be
connected to an electrical outlet for charging,
and limited fuel to conventional gasoline.
The most popular PHEV on the market in
the United States today is the Chevy Volt.
PHEV’s also count towards federal zero emission
mandates set in the Executive Order 13693.
An HEV, or a hybrid electric
vehicle, is a vehicle powered
by both an internal combustion
engine and an electrical engine.
The electrical engine provided increase fuel
economy and does not require an external plug
to recharge the battery, rather it is
recharged by the kinetic energy of the vehicle.
And familiar HEV’s offered through
GSA are the Ford Fusion hybrid
and the Hyundai Sonata hybrid.
And those do not require to be plugged in,
and they don’t count towards
federal zero emissions mandates.
So the table in this slide breaks
down the different components
that distinguish the three
types of electric vehicles.
When looking at the motor engine, HEV’s,
PHEV’s, and BEV’s all have electric motors.
However, the HEV’s and PHEV’s also
have internal combustion engines.
So fuel source is the next category on here.
The primary fuel source of an HEV and PHEV
is usually conventional gasoline or diesel,
while the BEV’s are fueled
entirely by electricity.
However, remember, the PHEV’s
can be fueled by electricity
and when they are plugged in and charged.
So next is the battery.
The battery type used in electric
vehicles has changed over time,
as industry automakers are turning to
lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.
Lithium-ion batteries have been commonly used
in everything from cell phones to laptops,
but more recently, automotive companies
have started using them in PHEV’s and BEV’s.
Lithium-ion batteries are smaller and lighter
than their nickel-metal hydrate counterpart,
which is the typical car
battery used in most vehicles.
This allows for the most energy
storage in a smallest space.
Additionally, lithium-ion batteries
are not affected by memory.
This means that the battery does
not have to be fully discharged
in order to maintain a long life.
For the most part, PHEV’s and BEV’s use the
lithium batteries, while HEV’s have tended
to use nickel-metal hydrate batteries.
However, we’ve started to see this
change and automotive manufactures seem
to be slowly adopting the
lithium ion batteries for use
in hybrid cars as the cost have come down.
So the next category on this
chart is vehicle range.
Vehicle range depends on the engine type and
battery size of the specific vehicle model.
However, typically HEV’s get
500 miles in one tank of fuel.
PHEV’s can go anywhere between 19 and
53 electric miles on a single charge,
depending on the model, and
have a combined electrical
and gasoline range of 420 miles or more.
Hybrid electric vehicle range varies
significantly between the models.
The only BEV available through GSA in
fiscal year 2016 is the Ford Focus electric,
which has a range of approximately 76 miles.
We’re going to see this increase in model year
2017, and Stephanie will get into that later.
Finally, as mentioned, please note that
HEV’s do not satisfy the zero emission
and PHEV requirements of Executive Order 13693.
So a common concern that we’ve heard with
electric vehicles is their battery life
and the high cost of replacing the battery.
However, as technology advances
and these are widely used,
both of these concerns have started to go away.
Today, most manufacturers offer am eight year
or 100,000 mile warranty for
electric vehicle batteries.
In some states, such as California and New
York, this warranty period is even longer.
GSA fleet has set a minimum vehicle
replacement standard for electric vehicles
within the battery warranty period so
that customers should never have to pay
for a replacement if the vehicle is
operating and maintained properly.
Replacement standards for electric vehicles
are dependent on both vehicle age and miles.
The minimum replacement standard for an electric
vehicle is 60,000 miles and five years old.
When it is seven years old,
regardless of the mileage,
or when it has traveled 85,000
miles, regardless of age.
Next, we’re going to go into some of the
considerations that you should be thinking
about before purchasing or
leasing an electric vehicle.
We have found that electric
vehicles are well-suited for agencies
when the average distance traveled per day is
60 miles or less, to avoid range limitations.
This will be extended as future
models start to have longer ranges.
Electric vehicles are also better when
they’re operated primarily on paved roadways.
They’re not the best off-road vehicle right
now just because they’re all sedan vehicles.
When vehicles are operating in cities
where there is a lot of start-stop driving,
or have high idle times, electric vehicles
are ideal because they are equipped
with regenerative braking
and start-stop features
that work really well on those conditions.
And we’ll get more into that on the next slide.
Electric vehicles also work well when
they’re not required to carry large loads.
Passengers are limited to five people
or less because these are sedans.
The large loads help to avoid excess
strain on the electrical engine,
so that that component is pretty important.
Finally, we recommend that agencies clearly
map out their vehicle routes and proximity
to both public charging stations and
to maintenance and repair facilities
that are certified to service electric vehicles.
Electric vehicle components are very different
from traditional internal combustion engines.
So agencies should check with their FSR to
ensure that there’s a dealership authorized
to service and repair better electric
vehicles and plug-in or hybrid vehicles.
And additional considerations that you
should be aware of in electric vehicles,
they have a new regenerative
braking feature that allows energy
to be recovered when drivers brake slowly.
This helps to extend the vehicle range as
well as the life of the braking system.
Regenerative braking is a feature in
all three levels of electric vehicles.
You’ll see them in hybrids, better
electrics, and plug-in hybrid electrics.
And it improves the efficiency of the vehicle.
Some other features to be aware of
include an EV later option in PHEV’s.
This allows the driver to decide when to use
the electric charge or gas to power the vehicle.
This can help to ensure that you are
maximizing the vehicle’s efficiency option.
The vehicle can switch seamlessly
between both types of fuel when in use.
So for example, if you start your trip on a
highway but eventually end up on city roads,
then we recommend that you utilize the
vehicle’s gas supply for highway driving
and save the electric charge for
start-stop and idle driving in the city.
This will extend the vehicle’s
range and reduce carbon emissions.
Additionally, all plug-in vehicles
currently available through GSA come standard
with a level I charging station cord.
This allows you to plug the vehicle into any
standard 110 or 120 volt electrical outlet.
Note that per manufacture recommendations,
extension cords should not be
used for this method of charging.
As we mentioned earlier, EV maintenance must be
handled by the original equipment manufacturer.
Only dealerships authorized to work
on plug-in electric vehicles can
complete work on the vehicle.
The preventative maintenance schedule
for electric vehicles looks slightly
different from your standard sedans.
So better electric vehicles should have
prevented maintenance every 10,000 miles
or 12 months.
And plug-in hybrid electric vehicles is
typically preventative maintenance every 15,000
miles or 24 months, that’s
what’s recommended by GSA fleet.
So next, I just want to go over really
quick the FY16 electric vehicle offerings.
So there are actually five vehicle
models available in fiscal year 2016.
We just had the Hyundai Sonata added, so
that’s a new one that you’ll see here.
This slide lays out all of their costs
from a purchase and lease perspective.
It also includes their full replacement
rate, which is a new offering this year.
The full replacement rate spreads the
incremental costs over the life of the vehicle.
Essentially GSA fleet is paying for the
up-front added costs of the vehicle.
But you the agencies are not burdened
with high up-front vehicle costs.
Customers can pay a full replacement rate
for the life of the vehicle, and replacement,
will only have to pay the base
price for a new electric vehicle.
So one thing that I do want to highlight here.
For those who have the Volt in the
past, there are some updates to it.
The price dropped significantly this year.
We were able to — it’s $2000
less than previous years.
It can now also run on regular
gasoline instead of the premium
that was required for older models.
And the range is up to 420 miles, that’s
40 miles more than it could before.
And the MPGE, the mile per gallon
equivalent figure, has drastically increased
to 106 miles per gallon equivalent.
So we’ve attached to this slide, on the screen
you’ll see, so you can download this and look
at the slide again, if you
need to refer back to it.
So finally, I just want to go into electric
vehicle range and some charging information
for those five vehicles that we just discussed.
So range and charging time required
by each vehicle should factor
into your selection process, because
each vehicle is a little bit different.
Right now, all five models can seat five people.
So this is an improvement over previous years.
As I said, the Chevy Volt
couldn’t seat five previously,
and also the Ford Focus electric model,
previous model, could only seat four.
So now all of them are standardized
to five people.
Both of the Ford PHEV models, the CMAX Energi
and the Fusion, have the exact same specs.
Their estimated electric range is 19 miles,
with a total combined range of 550 miles.
It will take an estimated two half hours
to fully charge the battery from empty
with a level II charging station.
The Hyundai Sonata gets plenty
greater range, electric range,
than both of the Ford models, at 27 miles.
And its overall total range is higher
than any other vehicle that we have,
any other electric vehicle that
we have right now, at 600 miles.
It’ll take approximately three hours to charge,
it’s because of the slightly bigger battery.
And then the Chevy Volt has more
than double the electric range
of the Ford and the Hyundai models.
It can get an estimated 53 miles per
charge, with a combined range of 420 miles.
It also takes longer to charge than the Ford
models because of the bigger battery size.
So it’s approximately four and a half hours
to charge the battery to full from an empty.
And then finally, the Ford Focus electric is
our only all electric vehicle, as we said.
It gets 76 miles of electric range
per charge with no backup fuel option.
It’s best for city use when the vehicle
does not travel more than 70 miles a day.
It looks like we have some questions here.
So what is the difference between
electric range and total range?
So electric range, when we’re talking electric
range and total range, we’re mostly referring
to the plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
And remember, those vehicles can be plugged into
electricity, or they can run off of gasoline.
So you have that split fuel type.
So electric range is the amount of
distance that it can travel on a charge,
but the total range includes
the charge and gasoline.
So like I said earlier, you can switch
between both fuel types when driving.
So if you run out of electric range when
you’re driving, your car won’t stop,
it’ll refer to the gas to power the vehicle.
So that’s why those numbers are so different.
Can the vehicle be left plugged
in after full charge is reached?
>>Yeah, so it can be left in, that’s
not ideal, because in some instances,
it’ll start draining some of the battery.
And, you know, you also want
to plug the vehicle back
in in case there’s someone
else who wants to charge.
But I mean, it technically can
be left in, it’s not ideal.
>>And in some instances, depending on your
vehicle type and your charging station,
if you leave the vehicle plugged in,
it’ll actually stop charging completely.
And so if you go to start the vehicle, say, a
week later, and it doesn’t have a full charge,
that might be why, because
it shut off the power.
So it’s not that there’s anything
wrong with your charger necessarily,
or your vehicle necessarily, just be
aware that that sometimes is a feature
in certain electric vehicles
and certain charging stations.
So the next question, how do
agencies know when the different types
of hybrid electric vehicles become
available for lease or purchase?
>>Yeah, so you can always check
the vehicle availability listing.
And there’s actually an option to sign up so
that you always get those updates emailed to you
from GSA automotive, I believe, is
the email address it comes from.
And so if you’re interested in signing up
for that, or you don’t know where to sign up,
you can go to the auto choice login.
But if you’re not sure where to
find that, you could always reach
out to us and we’ll send that to you.
The next question, level I versus level II
charging cord, differences and associated costs?
Well, Dave Way, we are going to get to that.
>>Yeah, we’ll hold off on that one.
>>Okay, and I think, yeah, Sherman,
you asked the final question.
Would this impact charge cycles, referring
to leaving the vehicle plugged in or not?
I’m not sure, okay, I’m not sure 100% what
you mean with that, would it take longer?
>>In terms of maybe when you were
addressing the battery capacity,
meaning after a certain amount of
time, the capacity starts to degrade.
I don’t know if that would
necessarily impact it.
I think after you do it a number
of times, you charge the battery.
>>And that’s part of the reason why you’ll see
in some vehicles that it stops the charging,
that’s to protect the battery from
being overheated or overstrained.
So that is a protection that
manufacturers have built in.
>>Okay, all right, great.
I think we’re going to move
on to the next slide.
Okay, so this is new actually from our
last desktop workshop presentation,
in case any of you sat in last week.
Just late last week, we announced a
new GSA electric vehicle initiative.
This is pretty exciting.
So GSA is offering both purchasing and
leasing customers the opportunity to purchase
or lease a Ford Focus electric for $16,160,
or $199 a month and 64 cents per mile.
No incremental, you know, stressing that.
And this is, you know, over
$10,000 in savings compared
to what the Ford Focus was previously priced at.
One thing to keep in mind
is that it’s exclusively
for zero emission vehicle states,
and those are listed below.
So the vehicles have to be
delivered to those states.
And so GSA is looking for a commitment
of at least 500 vehicles fleet wide
by, you know, the end of April.
And then we’re going to be
staggering delivery through September.
Oh, they can’t see any side.
Can anyone else not see slides?
I have one comment saying I can’t see.
Okay, just one person, okay.
So recently, this is a pretty exciting
initiative, and we really hope that everybody
who has the opportunity to place an electric
vehicle that makes sense really jumps on board.
So our communication so far, you
know, we’ve notified our team
in the field, so they’re aware of this.
And we’ve also reached out to all
of the headquarter fleet managers,
and we provided a list of their vehicles
that are eligible through end of December.
And we provided them a list of sedans, but,
you know, if you guys have a vehicle that’s,
you know, not a sedan, but you think
is perfect for this initiative,
please just reach out to us and let us know.
We just at least need to know the tag numbers
and the VINs, and we’ll respond back to you and,
you know, look at your vehicle plates.
This is great savings, so this is really going
to be the opportunity I think
to get these vehicles.
And these are pure electric
vehicles, as Megan was saying.
So 76 miles of full range.
The model year 2017 Focus is actually
going to come with 100 miles of range.
So just something to keep in mind.
Here’s our email address down at
the bottom, if you’re interested.
We’re going to move on to the next slide,
unless, does anyone have any questions?
Okay, how do agencies know when the different
types of hybrid — I already answered that.
You know, feel free to just type
your questions in throughout,
if you have other questions surrounding
this, and we’ll definitely get to them.
Okay, so back to what one of the questions
just was, types of charging stations.
So, you know, as many of you probably know,
there are three different levels
of electric vehicle charging.
Each level uses a different amount of
electricity, which impacts the rate
at which the electric vehicles
charge, and hence,
how long it takes for the
vehicle to get charged.
The level I charging is really
like the most basic charge.
It’s also referred to as trickle
charge, and can be done just
through a basic wall plug or an outlet.
This type of charging does not require
additional infrastructure beyond just access
to that outlet.
The level I stations, they’re
essentially they can just be cords
that plug into any 120 volt outlet.
And every electric or plug-in electric vehicle
comes standard with one of these cords,
so that anyone can charge the vehicle.
But we also want to say that there are
actually stations that are freestanding
that are commercially available, and
on GSA Advantage, that, you know,
might have other capabilities, you know,
they might have two ports,
different things like that.
So, you know, as you might be able to infer,
this form of charging takes the most amount
of time to recharge the vehicle battery.
For each hour that a vehicle is
charged through a level I outlet,
it gains two to five miles of range.
For the electric vehicles currently
available through GSA, it would take anywhere
between seven and 21 hours to fully charge
the vehicle battery using a level I station.
So you really need to weigh, you know, whether
you’re going to be using the vehicle constantly
to drive, you know, more than 76 miles,
you know, or other distances that —
and, you know, whether a level I
station will really be suited for you.
Also need to say that the level I
stations that plug into the wall, you know,
there’s really no way to record that vehicle
level data unless you’re metering that outlet,
and there’s, you know, only
one vehicle charging there.
Or, you know, if you’re looking to look at
your entire fleet from that one port, you know,
it can’t be down to the vehicle level.
So now let’s move on to level II.
So level II charging typically
requires the installation
of additional charging infrastructure.
And this is all available on GSA Advantage.
It provides vehicle charging at 240 volts.
And so this extra power means that vehicles
will charge more quickly than level I.
For each hour that a vehicle is
charged through a level II outlet,
it gains between ten and 20 miles of the range.
For the electric vehicles available through GSA,
manufacturers estimate that it takes anywhere
from two to five hours to fully
charge the vehicle battery.
And so finally, we’ll move on to level III.
So level III is really referred
to as DC fast charging.
And this is really the fastest
charging time available.
These stations typically use 480 volts of power
to fully charge the electric
vehicle in less than an hour.
However, keep in mind that not all electric
vehicles can be charged in a level III station.
The model year 2017 Ford Focus will actually
for the first time be able to
charge with DC fast charging.
But any vehicle that, you know,
you get today, the model year 2016
and prior, they weren’t able to use this.
The reason that you don’t see, you know,
people don’t talk about these stations as much
as being, you know, a solution for the
federal government is really the price,
they’re pretty expensive.
The stations can range from 13 to $40,000,
and then that doesn’t even
cover the installation cost.
Which many times, you’ll have to modify the
electric infrastructure that’s currently
in place.
So looking at GSA’s offerings, at this
time, none of the Ford 2016 electric
and plug-in electric vehicles
are compatible with level III.
But like I said, the 2017 Focus will be.
If you have any Nissan Leafs in
your fleet, they also will be.
But, you know, operators are
really advised to consult
with their vehicle manual before plugging
into or purchasing a level III station.
Because of the high voltage use to
charge vehicles in a level III station,
manufacturers also warn that DC fast charging
should be done sparingly, only when needed,
because of the strain that’s
placed on the battery.
Okay so, moving on, okay, level II
charging station usage and instructions.
So, charging the electric
vehicle, you know, is fairly easy.
Here are the steps that you
should really follow.
Step one, before charging your vehicle,
always remember to turn the vehicle off
and place it in the park position.
The electric vehicles currently available
through GSA can be charged using
a level I or level II station.
Step two, when using a level II station,
you must use the key fob or RFID card
to release the charging station handle.
There might be other charging
stations out there that, you know,
it might be a contactless credit card,
in that case, you can’t use a wex card.
So if you’re using a public station
that requires payment, the station,
just keep in mind, they must accept wex.
If the station has no fee for use, you can
simply follow the on-screen instructions
to initiate the charging session
and release the charging coupler.
So step three, you’re going to be inserting the
charging coupler into the vehicle’s charge port
to initiate the charging session.
Make sure the charging coupler
clicks to lock it into the port.
Step four, confirm that the
vehicle is charging properly.
Once the coupler is properly inserted
an indication light will appear,
either on the vehicle’s dashboard
or the light in a ring
around the vehicle charging port,
that way you know it’s charging.
And finally, step five, when
the vehicle is done charging,
you’re going to insert the coupler
back into the station holster.
Note that some stations will require users
to rescan their RFID card or
key fob to end the session.
Really, just be sure to follow the station’s
on-screen instructions for any further guidance.
And just, you know, feel free
to look up the company online,
see if there’s any other information that you
can learn, you know, if you have any questions.
There’s usually also either a
telephone number or an email address
that you can contact to find
out more information.
The next slide is on charging station etiquette.
So electric vehicle fueling is
obviously a very different experience
than most drivers are really used to.
So electric vehicles cannot be charged in five
minutes at a fueling station, so, you know,
in some ways they can’t always necessarily
be a first-come first-serve situation.
Sometimes it needs to be scheduled.
So it’s important that drivers
really take advantage of charging
at stations when they are available.
But if you are at a workplace,
it’s important to figure out,
you know, what works best for everyone.
You always need to remember to plug the vehicle
in after a trip or at the end of the day,
especially in motor pool situations.
Charging stations bring a
new dynamic to refueling.
For example, a vehicle operator should unplug
and move the vehicle when charging is complete
so that other vehicles can use the station.
This could be a hindrance at times
if you’re working or, you know,
it’s halfway through the day, but just
make sure that it works with your building.
You might need to coordinate a little bit.
Further, don’t unplug the
vehicle that is connected
to a charging station unless the vehicle being
charged is in your control or possession.
As a best practice, charge the vehicle overnight
to make use of reduced electricity rates
and to prevent overburdening
of the electrical grid.
Just like in conventionally fueled vehicles, the
driver who uses an electric range is responsible
for ensuring the vehicle’s properly recharged
for the next driver or the next trip.
So just try to be polite,
as I’m sure you all know.
Okay, so I’m going to talk about charging
station installation considerations.
A mouthful right there.
So before diving into the specifics
on how to take advantage —
okay, so I just want to really talk to you
guys about really considering, you know,
doing a lot of the planning up-front
before you select the type of stations.
So a little bit later in this presentation, I’m
just going to mention how we have an opportunity
for you to purchase electric vehicle
charging stations level II through us.
But, you know, before you do that, before
you select the station mount type, any other,
you know, whether it’s dual or single port,
you really need to think about your building
and think about, you know, where
this station will fit best.
So site planning will involve contacting the
contractors, facility managers, electricians,
fleet managers, any involved party, and
figuring out where it would work best.
So you’re going to also want to obtain
at least three different cost estimates.
And have the specs handy of what you need,
know which vehicle you’re looking to get.
So you might want a recommendation
for the location, the type of station,
like the mounts, any types of costs.
Really keep in mind that when
talking about cost, number two,
you want to look to market research and try
to find experienced contractors where you can.
But, you know, it’s costing to
exceed like $8000 or so, you know,
you might want to consider trying to see
if there’s a different place
you can install the station.
What we found in our second electric vehicle
pilot that, out of 160 stations, only around 155
or so were installed that the
average cost was around $2800.
There are obviously some higher
estimates and some lower estimates.
Existing infrastructure, location of the
conduit, those types of things, you know,
those are the things that
made the estimates go up.
But you really want to keep costs in mind.
You want to think long-term too.
Is your agency going to be relocating?
Are you currently in a building that’s leased
through either GSA or a commercial vendor?
You want to continue working with your
building manager and your agency as a whole
to see how this fits with your long-term plan,
as well as your long-term plan
with vehicle acquisitions.
Thinking about this new electric vehicle
initiative, you know, now’s really a good time.
You know, even if you decide you
want to order a vehicle next week,
you want to really start
planning the infrastructure today.
Just a few days ago, we actually met
with DOE’s SIN office in [inaudible],
and they actually have a tiger team
they’re putting together of experts
that are really there to help
agencies with the installation piece
of the equation for a charging station.
So if you guys are interested in talking
with them, please just reach out to us
and we can give you their contact as well.
And so finally, you just want
to finalize your requirements.
You’re going to want to select the mount type.
So, you know, something that can be mounted on
a wall, something that’s a freestanding pole.
Do you want it a single port or a dual port,
to be able to charge more than one vehicle?
You also want to know your
agency’s data requirements.
You know, asset level data reporting will be,
you know, something that you will all have
to do, so you want to make sure that
you figure out the right data plan.
And you also want to, you know, once you
decide what station you are going with,
just try as back as you can to
maintain good relations with the vendor
and figure out how they can help you.
Because, you know, you are purchasing a product
from them, so they will be able to [silence].
Enable you to buy charging stations.
So what we’ve done is we’ve taken our BPA that
we had set up with vendor Apollo Sunguard,
to acquire charging stations beginning in 2014
as part of our second electric vehicle pilot.
And we’re actually going to
be able to offer this to you.
So far, we’ve had three customers
that have taken us up on it.
Basically the pricing from
that BPA will still exist.
I’ll show you the stations in just a moment.
These are level II stations.
You’re going to have one year of
free data subscription services.
And delivery will come within
45 days of order placement.
So if you’re interested in that, just please
send an email to [email protected]
So this is an exciting thing because
hopefully, you know, we can eliminate some
of the administrative and contracting burden
that, you know, will fall upon you for going
out any getting these stations by just
being able to simply order through us.
So talking about FY17 plans and
beyond, we’re looking to set
up a multiple-award self-service
BPA as one thing.
We’re hoping that, you know, you
guys will be able to access that just
through auto choice, are purchasing website.
[Silence] data collection services.
We’ve already had [silence] where we’ve gotten
a lot of great information from industry
and what they can provide, but we’re hoping
that [silence] moving forward next year.
[ Audio Skips ]
It’s single port level II, so that
means it’ll charge your vehicle in two
to five hours, volts.
It also has the ability to collect data.
And another great thing is that we can actually
connect your wex card with vehicle tag,
so if you’re a GSA lease customer,
you’ll be able to get that charging data
in your fuel use report in GSA fleet drive-thru.
The second station, and this
applies to all stations.
But the second station, the type of
mount, it’s the same pole, you know,
it’s a Bollard pedestal mount,
but it has two ports.
So if you are going to have more
than one vehicle, this is really —
that needs to be charged at the same time,
this is really the most cost effective option.
So the final one is the wall-mounted station.
This is ideal for a parking garage.
So like I said, how to order off the BPA,
just please email us, [email protected],
and we’ll get you all set up there.
Okay, charging station vendors on schedule.
So this is pulled from GSA advantage, which
is modeled to look kind of like an Amazon
where you can just type in
whatever you’re looking for.
I find the best way to find
charging stations is just to type
in electric vehicle charging
station and see what comes up.
All the information, including the source
or the schedule, that will all be there,
the vendor’s name and their pricing,
and then, you know, the type of station.
So the mount type, the length of the cord,
whether it’s a gate weighed station or not,
all of these different components
will all be there.
And I know it can be difficult to navigate.
If you have any questions on
this, please just feel free
to email us again at [email protected]
So here are some of the manufacturers.
Other manufacturers that are also on schedule
include Bosch, Clipper Creek, I’m probably going
to mess up the pronunciation of these, EFACEC,
Hubbell, Pep Stations, and some others as well.
Okay, I also want to mention,
so we’ll go to the next slide.
Okay, so data plans can be offered by the
manufacturer coupled with the station.
So you might get the station
and it might include
that data plan, or it could be sold separately.
Some are included, like I said,
some are included with the initial
cost, and some are separate.
But they’re mostly all subscription based,
so you will have to consider the
cost to renew them every year.
A lot of the level II stations will operate
without a data plan, but you won’t be able
to collect data, you won’t be able to
view them on a map or at a data portal,
so it’s really something to consider.
Okay, now I’m going to go
into current industry trends.
So obviously, the prices of
batteries are continuing to drop.
We’re seeing that there’s
more affordable vehicles,
and they’re going to have increasing range
and fuel economy, which is kind of exciting.
The Tesla Model III was just released, as
many of you I’m sure have seen, for $35,000.
It’s already sold I think over 300,000
vehicles at this time, so that’s a lot.
So, you know, we’re seeing lower costs.
Chevy’s also testing electric cars
that have ever-increasing range.
Most vehicles now average a pure
electric range of 60 to 80 miles,
but advancements in battery technology have
allowed for the introduction of vehicles
that will top say 100 mile range,
starting with the Nissan Leaf.
And then, like I was mentioning earlier,
that 2017 Ford Focus will also
have a range of 100 miles.
So, you know, if you had that commute that was
80 miles and you really want an electric vehicle
but you couldn’t do it before,
now you’ll be able to do that.
So in addition, Chevy has also been testing
the Chevy Bolt battery electric vehicle.
It’s going to have 200 miles,
and that’s due out in 2017.
So exponential jump in range.
The market selection on EV’s is also
expanding into larger vehicle class categories.
Mitsubishi plans to introduce the
PHEV SUV in the spring of 2016.
So we’ll see about that one.
Chrysler has also just released plans
to do a plug-in hybrid electric minivan.
It’s scheduled to hit the market in 2017 as
the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica plug-in hybrid.
It’ll boast a 30 mile all electric range and
an MPEG equivalent of 80 miles per gallon.
So that’s pretty exciting.
Electric vehicle charging has
also gotten more sophisticated.
Companies are offering charging
behavior monitoring for fleets
to help them save electric and
prevent demand overloads on the electrical grid.
They provide software that interacts
with the vehicle to automatically time
when to charge them and to
avoid peak electricity rates.
So traditionally, you know, the power
grid is operated under the assumption
that electricity demand simply
happens .
And finally, workplace has really expanded.
It’s already in use at Google,
Coca Cola, and some others.
It’s used as a recruitment tactic.
And it tends to be something that
employees are really excited to see.
Federal Employee
Workplace Charging just come
out passed in December.
This is very exciting.
Agencies are now allowed to install stations
for employees to use on a reimbursable basis.
So there’s currently guidance that’s in the
works on both the GSA PBS side and the CEQ side.
So, you know, we’ll see when that comes out.
But hopefully that’ll give
everyone some more direction.
So future industry trends, so there’s going to
be a lot of improvements in battery technology.
Solid-state batteries, for example,
this effectively would double the range
of an electric vehicle while maintaining
the weight of current batteries.
Unlike lithium-ion, it doesn’t expand and
contract during charge and discharge cycles,
preventing batteries from short-circuiting.
Quick-charge batteries are also being looked at.
Researchers in Singapore are developing
batteries that charge to 70% in two minutes.
So they’re expected to be about 10 times
more charge than something current batteries.
Another thing that’s being
researched is breathable batteries.
Development is currently progressing on
new lithium air batteries that will be able
to hold five to ten times as much
energy as a lithium-ion battery.
They would be able to use air to aid energy
flow, which will result in less energy reduction
or in less energy and energy reduction
and put EV battery energy density
up to the gasoline standards.
And like we talked about
before, the 2017 Ford Focus,
we’ll see that increased range
from 76 miles to 100 miles.
So range improvements come
from battery improvement,
specifically lithium-ion improvements,
that have increased energy density.
Ford will also be adding, like I mentioned
before, the DC fast charging capabilities
to their vehicle, allowing the Focus
to reach 80% charge in 30 minutes.
So this vehicle will be available
beginning July 27.
Fuel cell vehicles are also on the horizon.
I know that many of you have likely added in
on the DOE’s fuel cell vehicle working group.
But, you know, at this time, we still see
those vehicles in very small quantities,
mostly in Southern California, some
in Massachusetts, and some in Hawaii.
But, GSA is always working to get
you guys, you know, the newest
and most advanced technology
vehicles and solutions that we can.
So when the vehicles are available, you
guys will be the first ones to know.
So, that’s the end — well, actually, before
we end our presentation, does anyone have —
or before we move on to the next portion of our
presentation, does anyone have any questions
on anything they have heard so far?
Okay, I don’t see any questions popping
up, so, I’m going to turn the presentation
over to my Branch Chief, Matt
Stockburger, and he’s going to go
through our AFV acquisition tool.
>>Thank you, Steph.
Hi, everyone.
I’m going to — bear with me as
I try to share my screen here.
Everyone can see it?
Okay, so, the role of our team AFV
is to help you, the customer, have,
make sure that you have all the
information you need to manage your fleet
from a sustainability perspective.
that information so that you
can focus on other aspects of your job.
So, with that, I want to take just a few
minutes to walk through one of the tools
that we publish every year to help you
in your annual acquisition planning
around alternative fuel vehicles.
You know that as an agency fleet
manager, you have a very difficult job.
And one of the most difficult aspects is,
every year, coming up with acquisition plans
that walks the tightrope between replacing
your fleet with an eye on your budget
so that you’re not exceeding your budget
with all the constraint you’re facing,
but at the same time replacing your fleet
with vehicles that are more fuel-efficient,
more sustainable, and many times
that comes with a higher price tag.
So, to help you with that
planning, we’ve created a tool
that we call the alternative
fuel vehicle acquisition tool.
Many of you may be very familiar with
the annual AFV guide that we publish.
that lists all for every contract
year, all of the vehicles that are available
for purchase or lease, that meet the low
greenhouse gas controls that are set by EPA,
as well as meet the qualifications of
alternative fuel vehicle designation.
That information is posted on a
spreadsheet, and we publish it every year
on our GSA portal website, which I
have up in front of you right now.
The URL is kind of forgettable,
it’s a string of numbers,
but if you ever have any questions,
feel free to email my email.
Also, many times, if you want to pull it,
find it, you can just go on to Google and type
in GSA AFV guide, and it’ll
take you right to this page.
So the AFV guide and all the other publications
are down here under the documents section.
But I want to specifically walk through
the last document here on the list,
and that’s the alternative
fuel vehicle acquisition tool.
And I have it open here.
So as versus just
a spreadsheet that, you know,
lists all the vehicle information .
tabs, the first tab is
basically a step-by-step instruction list
that you can view when you have time.
The one thing I want to point
out is in using this tool,
you need to make sure your
macros in your Excel are enabled.
And you do this by clicking on the developer
tab here at the top, the button here,
macro security, and then you want to
make sure you click on enable all macros.
Because the spreadsheet actually works
off of various macros
to give you the information you need.
So with that, you’ll want
to click on the next tab,
which is where you will actually
make your vehicle selections.
Pull down all the information you’ll
need on every type of low green gas
and AFV that is available for
purchase or lease of that fiscal year.
I’ll just mark here a quick example, so you
get an idea of how the spreadsheet works.
So let’s say, you know, you’re looking
to replace your sedans with, you know,
various types, whether it’s low greenhouse
gas or E85 or electric or hybrid,
you can find all that information and
compare everything here in the spreadsheet.
So you’ll go to this box up here in box one,
where there’s a drop-down list
of all the various vehicles.
You can choose from sedan all the
way to the pickup trucks and buses.
For the sake of simplicity, let’s select sedans.
May want to pick the specific SIN that
you’re looking to find more information on.
So let’s just pick the 8C
for now subcompact sedan.
Then you want to select the
fuel type, E85 or gas.
You’ll just say gas.
Then the next you want to keep
going over to the next box.
Here in box number four, you can check
whether or not this vehicle is EISA compliant,
meaning it complies with the designation
as a low greenhouse gas vehicle.
So you could tell it yes or no .
And then here, it depends on
where that vehicle is located.
If it’s located in a state that follows
the more aggressive emission standards
that California adheres to, then you’ll want
to click yes for carbon emissions state.
So it’s going to be delivered to a state that
complies with the carb emission standards.
And it’s again, yes or no.
so then once you click those
boxes, you’ll scroll to the right
and you’ll see all the models of vehicles
that are available for award or for purchase
or lease here in this section here.
It provides the vehicle purchase price,
the monthly and model lease rates,
information on their fuel efficiency as
well as their grams per mile emissions.
So pulling that information so you
can compare models .
We want to isolate one of them.
So let’s just say the Ford Focus standard
low greenhouse gas gasoline vehicle.
Make sure you’re on that row, click calculate.
And what that will do is pull
down that vehicle to the point
where you can actually start comparing the costs
for that vehicle based on however many you want
to purchase, the estimated miles per year
that you typically will drive
for that vehicle class and type.
So let’s say for this purpose, you know,
you want to get five of these Focus.
So you know, you’ll type in the quantity there.
On average, your sedans get about 10,000
miles a year, so you’ll type in 10,000 miles.
Then right here in the financial
implications screen,
you’ll see exactly how much it’ll cost you to
purchase those vehicles, those five vehicles,
so roughly $73,000, versus lease those vehicles.
And this captures the first year least costs.
And so that includes the
mileage rate and the monthly rate
for five different vehicles
driving 10,000 miles a year.
You can save all this information
into vehicle one.
Let me do that again, I hit the wrong button.
So you can save all that information into
vehicle one by clicking this button here.
So that shows you, you know, now you know
you want to purchase five Ford Focus.
But then, you know, I want to compare what if
I were to purchase five Ford Focus electrics.
You go through the steps again at the top.
Sedan, instead of 8C, you’ll take the
8E, fuel type electric, that’ll then —
this year, we only have one pure
electric vehicle, select the Ford Focus.
It’ll pull in — you can change the quantity,
but for simplicity purposes,
we’ll leave it at five.
Same number of miles.
And then you would pull that
vehicle into bucket two.
So here you can kind of compare the costs.
So either leasing or purchasing a Ford Focus
gasoline vehicle versus the Ford Focus electric.
You can also do a third vehicle as well.
You can also basically compare the fuel
efficiency between the vehicles, the emissions.
And then finally, down at the
bottom, you can pull it into —
instead of comparing the two
vehicles, you can see both of them.
So it’ll give you the full
financial implications
of buying ten Ford Focus,
five gasoline, five electric.
And you do that by clicking on the
hypothetical acquisition analysis.
So this is the information you can kind of
pull down, copy and paste into a spreadsheet
and present to your senior management
when you’re building your
acquisition plans every year.
It’s really basically an easier way
to isolate the information you need,
rather than going through the AFV guide and
pulling it out into a separate spreadsheet
and running the calculations on your own.
So we publish it every year.
And I know the ordering season for the
leased fleet is essentially wrapping up,
but you can use this as you’re purchasing
vehicles for your agency own fleet.
And again, we’ll be updating this with every
contract here, so be on the lookout for that.
With that, I will open up the floor in the few
minutes remaining for any questions you have
on recommendations, the electric vehicle
initiative, as well as this acquisition tool.
The initiative, you want to really
look into this initiative because the prices
that we get on these vehicles are extremely
low, but they’re contingent on volume.
And we have very little time to get
the volume into Ford so that they —
you know, really
on those prices for us.
With the price of $16,000
for an electric vehicle,
you’re looking at a much more attractive than electrics have been in the past.
So definitely take that information and get back
to us if you can before May 1 .
You can email us, again, at
gsafleetafvteam email inbox.
The phones are unmuted, so
you can ask any questions.
>>I have a question from
West Palm Beach, Florida.
>>Hi, there.
>>Hi. Yes, when do you anticipate us being
able to acquire these types of vehicles?
Your lists only include maybe
six or eight states.
However, why is Florida not on there yet?
>>So it definitely just the pricing that we
mentioned, that $16,160 and a lease rate of 199
and six and almost half cents per mile.
So that applies to those states, and the other
states would have to pay the normal rate.
And that’s really because we
actually kind of negotiated this deal
because the zero emission states basically
give the manufacturers some extra credits
that they need to be able
to sell bigger vehicles,
and so that’s why they offered this to us.
And you know, we figured it was
better to take this really, you know,
advantageous price than to not take it at all.
I know that, you know, it’s not ideal if you’re
not in one of these states, but hopefully,
you know, you can maybe, you know, if you order,
if your agency as a whole is ordering
these vehicles to those states,
maybe they’ll have some extra money to use
in Florida or, you know, any other state.
>>And you can also, if you download this slide
presentation, slide number ten has the pricing
that you would be paying in Florida.
It’s the regular pricing,
not the special pricing.
So you can still order all
five of those vehicles.
>>Oh, okay, great.
And I ask you, we don’t have the cars
yet obviously, but can we go ahead
and try to initiate the acquisition
of the charging stations right now?
>>Yeah, that would actually be great.
Hopefully, you know, everyone, if you’re
planning on ordering an electric vehicle,
even in the next year or so, you know, really
get started with that infrastructure because,
you know, you don’t want to be left with, say,
a battery electric vehicle
that you can’t really drive.
And like you were saying earlier, all these
stations do come with a standard level I cord
that can be plugged into any outlet.
But, you know, if you’re planning for
some infrastructure, you really you want
to get started as soon as you can.
>>And the best way to do that is just
email you at the email address you said,
for any technicalities if they should come up?
>>Yeah, you can just email us.
>>Okay, and then the initiative for
the employees, I guess like you’d said,
I just want to clarify it that
the fast act really doesn’t go
over exactly how we approach this,
but that is being looked at right now.
Is there any way I could be put on your mail
list to notify me when that is arranged?
>>Sure. And I’m thinking that they probably
were just going to I would hope disseminate it
through headquarters to managers,
but we’ll definitely make sure
that you know when it’s out.
>>Okay, that would be great.
I’m with the Green Program, and I’m really
trying to move forward with this as much
as I can to initiate these stations in Florida.
I’d appreciate it if you’d contact me too.
>>If you’re not already, I can get you signed
up for our quarterly newsletters as well,
because that will also be a good way for you
to find out information on things like this.
>>Okay, great, thank you.
>>Okay. Great.
>>Any other questions?
>>Yes, my name is John Watkins, I’d like
to get a copy of the slide presentation.
>>Yeah, you should be able to.
If you see on the right-hand side of
your screen, there’s a box at the top
that says files, you should be able
to click on the electric vehicle
and charging station slide
deck and download it that way.

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