Day 16 Soldering Multi Strand Copper wires Together DIY Maker Tips and Tricks Automotive Repair

Day 16 Soldering Multi Strand Copper wires Together DIY Maker Tips and Tricks Automotive Repair


hello and welcome back to my 30 videos
in 30 day series today I’m going to show
you how I solder together wires
before we start soldering I’m gonna go
over some of the tools that are needed
first of all you’re going to need a
soldering iron one of my favorite
soldering irons is a pencil style
soldering iron like this they’re great
because they’re inexpensive you combine
for four or five dollars they’re very
lightweight easy to hold onto and they
work really well to downfall to a pencil
style soldering iron you have to plug
this in five or ten minutes before you
want to solder if you’re at home as a
hobbyist five or ten minutes is
generally not a problem if you’re
working in a production shop as I was
for an auto technician for 22 years you
want something that’s a little bit
faster than that I always used this
butane soldering iron these are great
because like the pencil style they’re
small but they’re cordless so I don’t
have to be tied to a cord they’re also
great from the time I turn this on to
the time this is hot enough to melt
solder is generally about 20 seconds
third style soldering iron that works
really well is this gun style this is a
Weller that I purchased in high school
these are 40 to 50 dollars still today
Weller advertises that takes six seconds
for this tip to heat up I think it
probably takes more like 10
either way it’s quite fast the
disadvantage to this is this is very
heavy this is way easier to hold on to
especially if you’re working in a
confined space like under a – under a
vehicle even underneath the hood this is
quite a bit to fit into a lot of spaces
this is where I really like the butane I
had the small pencil style and it was
cordless the Dom fall to this butane
there was this was over $100 soldering
iron it really doesn’t do any better of
a job than this four dollar one would do
a few other tools you’re going to need
you did need some kind of a wire
stripper and a wire cutter these
do-it-all ones are fairly nice because
that’s exactly what they do they do it
all I can strip wire here I have the
style for the insulated and the non
insulated crimpers this even has some
bolt cutters
to be able to break little machine
screws or cut little machine screws
something I’ve never used but it is on
there and then you have a wire cutter
way out here at the tip I also find that
a small side cutters is very nice this
one happens to be a flush cutter cutting
edge is flush with this edge on a normal
cutters your cutting edge is a V and
that V then leaves a little bit of an
overhang of either a zip tie or wire
hanging out this cutter has a straight
edge with the bevel only on one side
it cuts exactly flush with the edge of
the cutter that allows you to cut the
end of a zip tie off without leaving a
sharp tail hanging out it also allows
you to snip the wires will make an
alignment splice without leaving any of
the solid core wire hanging out you’re
also going to need solder for electrical
connections you should use a 60-40 rosin
core solder that’s 60% 1040 percent lead
and by rosin core that means this tube
is hollow and on inside of this there’s
a rosin paste
rosin paste is there to clean the wire
before the solder it cleans oxidation
off of that wire with the heat of the
soldering iron it’s not there to clean a
corroded wire but it’s there to clean
just that little bit of oxidation off
generally not enough that you can see
but enough that would otherwise impede
that bond of that solder any time I’m
using used wire and I’m splicing
anything on a car I always add a little
bit of rosin paste you’re also going to
need tape or heat shrink to cover your
repair afterwards the first thing you
need to know before you solder wires
together is to know what kind of wire
you have wire comes in two styles
there’s a multi stranded copper wire
which has depend upon the quality of the
wire and the size of the wire is
anywhere from a couple dozen to a couple
hundred individual strands of copper
wire in it or there’s the solid core
wire which the size of the wire is one
solid piece multi strand wire is much
more flexible this is what’s used in
automobiles because this multiple strand
wire allows it to flex without breaking
in houses in components that don’t have
any movement a lot of times this single
strand or solid core wire is used
because it’s less expensive to produce
today I’m going to show you how to
solder multi strand wire if you’re
looking to solder solid core wire
together I would suggest going to make
magazines YouTube channel they have a
very good two and a half minute
demonstration on how to make a lineman
splice it is the best way to splice
together solid core wire and it’s the
only way I would ever splice together
solid core wire I will leave a link to
the make youtube channel in my
description check out their channel
their demonstration to spot-on
the first step is we’re gonna want to
strip about three quarters of an inch to
an inch of insulation off of the wire
now that I have three quarters of an
inch of wire stripped off of each of
those I
not twist these together I see a lot of
people their first instinct is to twist
these I feel that if you leave them like
this they twist together better because
this can kind of flatten out a little
bit and makes for a cleaner connection
when you’re done I overlapped the two
wires so I make an exit
I’ll hold one side of the X with my
pointer finger and my thumb now take the
other side of the X and I’ll twist those
wires together once I have one side of
the X twisted I’m able to hold that side
and then I’m able to twist the other
side of the X together now that I’ve
done that I have a wire connection that
is just barely larger than the wire of
those two wires together and have a wire
connection that’s quite strong already
electrically the solder is going to make
it a much more conductive bond but
physically this is already a strong wire
I’m going to use the set of these extra
hands for this video in the real world I
find that these are almost impossible to
use you can never fit a set of these
extra hands underneath the hood or
underneath the dash and that’s why this
connection I really like it really holds
them together tight before you ever make
any kind of a solder connection this
step is not that important if you’re
soldering new wires but whenever you’re
soldering old wires make it a wire and
repair I find just a little bit extra
rosin or soldering paste on that wire
prior to soldering really makes the
soldering go better
an acid brush is a good way to get it on
there the number one thing that you need
to know for soldering and it doesn’t
matter what kind of soldering iron
you’re using it doesn’t matter what kind
of solder you’re using it doesn’t matter
you could be using a torch what you need
to know is that you need to melt the
solder with the wire not with the
soldering iron sometimes one drop of
software on the soldering iron will
increase the surface area between the
soldering iron and the wire and help
heat up the wire faster but you need to
make sure that as you see here the wire
is hot and the wire is melting the
solder that’ll make sure that the solder
gets drawn in all the way through the
wire if I was to heat up and drop the
solder on top and not get the wire
itself hot
that styler will just it’s what’s called
a cold solder joint and that solder just
balls up on top and doesn’t penetrate
and with no penetration you do not get a
strong solder joint I’ll take a photo of
this to show it closer but this complete
from end to end here all of those fibers
all of that copper is pulled in solder
if I was the pull on this wire now that
should be the strongest point of the
wire it should break on one side of that
before it breaks inside of that joint
this technique is very similar to a
lineman splice and what I feel is the
best splice for multi strand wire that
you can make there are other ways to do
it but this is what I feel is the
strongest neatest cleanest way of doing
it now that that wire has been repaired
we have to now cover that exposed
surface we can do that one of two ways
electrical tape works quite well if you
use good electrical tape I use 3m super
33 electrical tape it is the only
electrical tape I will use anything less
than 3m super 33 to me is garbage has
good elasticity to it so when you wrap
it around the repair that elasticity
will pull the tape to the wire and make
sure that the elements stay out of it an
even better way to repair a wire is to
use heat shrink tubing first find a
piece of heat shrink that just a little
bit larger than your wire and slide it
over your repair I find a heat gun does
a much better job than a lighter
this repair is barely any larger than
the wire itself you end up with a nice
neat clean repair when you do it this
way much nicer neater and cleaner than a
cramped connector would be thank you for
watching my demonstration on how to
solder wires together
I really believe what I’m gonna call a
modified lineman splice is the best
solder repair that you can do on a
multi-strand wire it is quite small
barely larger than the wire itself so
that it’s easy enough to conceal back in
a harness back and wherever it needs to
go and it’s a very strong mechanical
bond and a very good electrical bond and
then when it comes to tools I really
believe the five dollar pencil soldering
iron is your best bet if you have any
questions please leave them in the
comments I’d love to answer any
questions you have about soldering I’d
also like to get into any discussions
you have about why you feel that maybe a
different solder joint is better than
this solder joint thank you for watching
and until next time peace

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