8002 Nitro-Fuzer Setup and Use

8002 Nitro-Fuzer Setup and Use


This is the setup and use video for the 8002
Nitro-Fuzer® Welder.
This welder has analog temperature controls,
dual-gas input, includes a cart,
uses a nitrogen tank, and requires assembly.
Thank you for your purchase of the Polyvance
8002 Nitro-Fuzer® nitrogen plastic welder.
This is a fully-capable analog nitrogen welder
for the budget-minded shop.
Polyvance was the first to bring nitrogen welding technology to the automotive collision repair industry in
2006, and we have continued to be the innovator in nitrogen plastic welding since that time.
Your nitrogen plastic welder will give you the ability to weld virtually any broken plastic material quickly
and with great strength.
Please watch this entire video to learn how
to set up and use your new plastic welder.
This video includes the following sections:
Unboxing and Initial Setup, Safety First,
Turning on the Welder for the First Time,
Doing a Basic Weld, Helpful Accessories, and Troubleshooting
To keep the costs down on the 8002 Nitro-Fuzer®,
we ship the welder and the cart in two boxes.
You will have to assemble the cart yourself.
This video and the supplied assembly instructions
will walk you through the process.
The smaller of the two boxes contains the
welder, which is fully assembled and ready to go.
This box also contains the nitrogen bottle
regulator, airless plastic welder and tips,
power cord, and a selection of welding rod.
The larger box contains the welder cart that
we will assemble.
Inside the box, you will find the assembly
instructions and all of the welding cart components.
You will need to have some tools to assemble
the cart, like a Phillips-head screwdriver,
a seven-sixteenths inch wrench, and a speed driver.
The cart assembly will take about half an hour.
Once the cart box is unpacked, you’ll see
that you have a total of 20 different components.
You should have one bag of nuts and bolts,
one bag containing the bottle chains, the power strip,
air manifold, and all the sheet
metal parts, which are made in the USA.
The one tricky part of putting the cart together
is making sure the legs are put on the proper side.
The legs are mirror images of each other.
You can see that these two holes are flipped,
so you want to make sure the holes point toward the front of the cart when you assemble it.
After assembling the cart, it’s time to install
the welder onto it.
Put the welder on up on the top shelf.
Put one sheet metal screw through, line it
up on the bottom,
and screw it in by hand loosely until you have everything lined up.
Put the second screw in, and make sure it
also lines up with the hole in the bottom of the welder.
Then use the speed driver to finish tightening
up the screws.
Now that the welder is secure, it’s time to
hook up the plumbing to the welder.
First, we need to connect the compressed air.
Take the green tube and connect one end to
the air input fitting on the air manifold,
run it through the hole in the bottom of the shelf,
and then to connect it to the push-connect fitting on the back of the welder.
The final plumbing task will be to install
the nitrogen bottle regulator
to the nitrogen connection on the back of the welder.
Run the green tubing up through the hole in
the back of the cart, up through the hole in the shelf,
and then insert it into the second push-connect fitting on the back of the welder.
To establish the electrical connection between
the welder and the power strip,
you’ll just insert the end of the power cord into the
back of the welder
and plug the other end into the power strip.
If there is any masking tape on the nitrogen
welder torch, remove it.
Carefully attach the nitrogen welder hose
to the welder by lining up the notches in each part.
Don’t push the connector in — the pins are
easily damaged.
Use the threaded collar to pull the connector in.
Next, we will set up the airless plastic welder.
The airless plastic welder is used for smoothing
your nitrogen welds,
and is essential for repairing urethane plastics.
The nitrogen welder cannot be used to repair urethane.
The airless welder comes with two welding tips: the flat, teardrop shaped tip is used for smoothing welds,
and the tube welding tip
with the hole that you feed rod through.
You will use the tube tip and our urethane
plastic welding rod to repair urethane bumpers.
Since we will be using the flat tip more often,
we will screw it into the airless welder.
Plug the airless welder into the front of the welder.
Now we need to get set up for welding.
Install your shop’s quick disconnect plug
into the air manifold on the front.
The hole on the front is intended for a whip
hose to supply air to your plastic grinding tools.
Polyvance sells a 10-foot whip hose with an
in-line blower as an accessory.
Next, get the nitrogen tank set up.
Thread the chains through one side of the
brackets on the back of the cart
to get ready to receive the bottle.
Order a tank from your local welding gas supplier.
The size that works well is the 125 cubic
foot tank, which stands about four feet tall.
This tank will flow for almost four hours
at 15 liters per minute.
At ten minutes per repair, it should allow
you to do roughly 23 repairs.
Chain the tank in place using both the upper
and lower chains.
Inspect the tip of your nitrogen tank regulator
to make sure that it is clean and smooth.
The conical face of the tip is what creates
the seal to the tank valve, not the threads.
Accordingly, do NOT use any nylon thread tape
on the regulator threads.
Just screw it in by hand, then tighten firmly
with a wrench after the tip makes contact.
Unscrew the T-handle until loose, then slowly
crack the valve on the tank.
The gauge closest to the tank shows the tank pressure.
The other gauge shows the downstream, or outlet
pressure, of the nitrogen.
Turn the T-handle to get about 25 psi of
outlet pressure.
Put the included tools, accessories, and welding
rods in the tool bins at the top of the cart.
With the air line and nitrogen hooked up,
you are now ready to use the welder.
Please watch the rest of this video to learn
how to use your welder for the first time.
Before you turn on your welder for the first time, please keep in mind the following safety precautions.
First, use safety glasses whenever grinding
or sanding plastic.
Second, we’d recommend that you use mechanic’s gloves
to protect yourself against accidentally touching hot components.
Finally, and most importantly, do NOT touch
the metal barrels on either the nitrogen welder
or the airless welder.
They get VERY hot and can cause severe burns
on contact.
Be conscious of this hazard as you weld
and try to prevent distractions from taking your mind off this point.
Your Polyvance welder has automatic low-flow
heating element protection, but despite that,
always get the air and nitrogen flowing through
the torch before you turn on the heat.
First, attach your shop’s compressed air line
to the air manifold at the front of the welder.
Make sure your air is clean, dry, and free of oil.
Oil and water in your compressed air will
damage the welder’s internal components.
If in doubt, install a filter-dryer at the
wall where you plug in your welder.
The 8002 Nitro-Fuzer® has a manual valve
for switching between air and nitrogen.
With the red handle pointed to the air side, turn the flow valve until you have about 12 liters per minute
of flow indicated by the
flow meter.
This is a good level for the air side.
You shouldn’t have to adjust the air because
you won’t be using air to weld;
it just keeps the heating element at a steady temperature.
Now that the air side is set up, it’s time
to set up the nitrogen side.
Switch the valve to nitrogen.
You’ll see the ball in the flow meter drop to zero.
We have to open the bottle valve to get some
nitrogen inlet pressure to the welder
before we can adjust the flow.
Before you crack the bottle valve, loosen
the T-handle on the pressure regulator
to prevent any pressure spike from damaging the regulator.
Open the bottle valve.
Turn the T-handle to establish about 25 psi
of nitrogen pressure to the welder.
Making sure the red valve is pointing to the
nitrogen side,
twist the flow valve until the ball floats at about 12 liters per minute.
This is a good flow rate for your average
bumper cover.
If you are welding a very thin area, you can
reduce the flow to about 10 liters per minute
to prevent distortion of the plastic.
If you are welding something thicker, like
a heavy truck side panel,
increase the flow to about 15 liters per minute to weld faster.
With Polyvance’s nitrogen plastic welders,
you get full control of the welding process.
Before you turn on the power, you should make
sure you have flow on both the air and nitrogen sides.
Check to feel the flow coming from the tip
and verify using the flow meter
that there’s about twelve liters of flow on both the air
and nitrogen sides.
Plug in the power strip, and make sure it
is on by looking for the lighted red switch.
Turn the power on to the welder with the on-off
switch on the back of the welder.
You will notice the green “pressure safe” light glowing because there is sufficient airflow through the welder.
Adjust the temperature of the nitrogen side
to match the plastic you’re working with
and the nitrogen flow you plan to use.
For polypropylene welding with the standard
flow setting of twelve liters per minute,
the temperature should be set to 7.
You will be able to feel the air start getting
hotter immediately.
Allow about five minutes for the element to
warm up completely before use.
Turn on the airless plastic welder to help
smooth out your plastic welds.
For polypropylene, set the temperature at
the “PP” setting on the dial.
It will take about five minutes for the airless
welder to get up to the proper temperature.
While your welder is warming up, select the welding rod that matches the plastic you will be welding.
If everything seems to be functioning as described,
you’ll be ready to perform your first weld.
Please watch the next section of this instructional
video to see how to perform a basic nitrogen weld.
Before that, though, let’s take a look at
how to properly shut down the welder.
First, turn off the main power switch on the
back of the welder.
Let the air continue to run for about five
minutes to cool down the heating element.
This will help to prolong the life of your
heating element.
Close the valve on the nitrogen tank to prevent
any leakage.
Once the welder has cooled completely, disconnect the welder from the shop air supply and unplug the welder.
If you’ve never done a nitrogen plastic weld
before, don’t be afraid to try it out.
For safety’s sake, be aware that the barrels
of both heating elements get extremely hot
and may cause burns.
Wear eye protection and temperature-resistant
gloves for your safety.
Get a bumper out of your scrap pile.
Clean both front and back with soap and water
first and let it dry.
Look on the backside of the part for the plastic
ID symbol.
These are usually two or three-letter designations
molded into the backside.
The letters are often shown between two arrows
pointing toward them.
Here, you can see the bumper says “PP-EPM”,
which means the plastic is a mixture of polypropylene and synthetic rubber.
Whenever you see the “PP” on the part, use the
R02 polypropylene welding rod.
Your welder comes with a selection of natural
polypropylene rod in five different profiles.
For fusion welding, always use the welding
rod that matches the substrate.
Do not use FiberFlex welding rod with the
nitrogen welder.
This is a specialty welding rod for use with the airless plastic welder, which you can learn to use later.
At this point, let’s concentrate on a simple
nitrogen weld on a polypropylene bumper.
To practice a full bumper repair, cut the
bumper at the bottom edge
for a couple of inches with a pair of tin snips.
Do your weld on the backside first with the
R02-04 welding rod.
Grind a shallow v-groove into the plastic on the backside with a die grinder about the width of the welding rod.
In order to perform a good fusion weld, you
have to expose the raw plastic,
so grinding off any paint overspray is essential.
To strengthen the repair, grind along the
edge for about an inch on either side of the split
so you can weld a reinforcing tee.
Finally, apply aluminum tape to the outer
surface of the tear to align the damage.
Normally you’ll weld from the inside toward
the edge.
Starting here, hold the welding rod close
to the bumper and preheat the end of the rod
and the bumper using the hot nitrogen gas.
The bumper will start to look glossy and the
end of the rod will start to melt.
At this point, apply a slight downward pressure
on the rod
while continuing to focus the hot nitrogen gas at about a 45-degree angle where the two materials come together.
The key to making a strong nitrogen weld is
to melt both plastics at the same time.
Note that the welding rod is held perpendicular
to the surface while the welder torch is held
very close to where the rod meets the bumper.
The rod will roll down onto the bumper naturally
as it gets to the right temperature
as you hold a slight downward pressure on the rod,
fusing the two plastics together as you make your pass.
When you get to the end, cut the welding rod by heating on the top and gently pulling straight off or down.
Allow the weld to cool for a bit, then reinforce
the repair by welding a tee along the edge
using the same technique.
Weld along the edge for about one inch on
either side of the tear.
Again, cut off the welding rod when you reach
the end by heating the top and pulling straight
or using the torch’s nozzle to cut the ribbon.
While the weld is hot, you can use the airless
welder to smooth the weld if needed.
Don’t flatten the weld completely, just dress
the edges and smooth it.
Let the weld on the backside cool completely
before you do anything on the frontside.
Cooling can be accelerated by blowing compressed
air or applying a wet towel on the weld.
Once it’s cool, flip the bumper over and peel
the aluminum tape off the frontside.
On the front, use one of the narrower welding
rods to keep the repair area as small as possible.
For this repair, let’s use the R02-07 narrow ribbon.
Grind a v-groove about the width of the welding
rod halfway through the bumper,
or until you see the welding rod from the other side become exposed.
An optional step would be to feather the paint
back from the v-groove with some sandpaper.
Again, it’s important to weld only to raw
plastic, not paint.
As before, direct the heat from the nitrogen
welder at about a 45-degree angle
to heat both the bumper and the end of the welding rod.
After the plastics begin to melt, apply a
slight downward pressure on the rod to begin your weld.
Keep the welder’s heat focused where the rod
and bumper come together,
making sure to melt both plastics at the same time as you make your pass.
If the v-groove is not filled with welding rod, make another welding pass until the v-groove is filled.
When that is done, use the airless welder
to smooth the top of the weld.
Lay the welder on the surface and pre-heat
the welding rod with the nitrogen at the same time.
Let the weld cool to room temperature before
sanding or testing its strength.
This can be accelerated by blowing it with
compressed air or applying cold water.
Test the strength of your weld before you
invest any time in the refinishing process.
As you can see, this weld will be more than
sufficient to carry this bumper to its next accident.
Once you’re satisfied with the strength, sand
the weld flush by knocking it down with a
50 grit disc in an angle grinder, then using
80 grit in a DA sander.
Normally you’ll sand the repair slightly flush
then apply a flexible filler to finish.
Polyvance’s 2000 Flex Filler is an excellent choice,
for its epoxy formulation gives it great flexibility and it is easy to sand and finish.
Congratulations on making your first plastic weld!
Your welder comes with a QR code sheet which gives you
instant access to Polyvance’s complete training video library.
Please review some of the other welding techniques
on the Polyvance website
or on the Polyvance smartphone app.
Polyvance has the industry’s most extensive
plastic repair and refinishing training resources.
If you are interested in taking one of Polyvance’s
live, hands-on I-CAR Training Alliance courses,
contact our training department by going to
our website or calling our toll-free number.
Although your Polyvance plastic welder is
the most fully featured in the industry, Polyvance
offers other accessories to help make plastic
repair easier, faster, and more profitable.
Check out the “Accessories” brochure that
came with your welder
or go to the Polyvance website for the current offerings.
One of the most popular accessories is the
6146 Bumper Pliers kit,
which helps make repairs to the rectangular mounting slot tabs much easier.
The metal die inserted into the hole prevents
melted welding rod from obscuring the hole,
making the process easier and more accurate.
After the plastic cools, you’ll simply have
to finish the top and the edge for a complete repair.
A plastic stapler from Polyvance is a helpful
complement to the plastic welder.
Hot staples are great for holding headlight
tabs in position
or for tacking long tears together that are too much for the aluminum tape to hold by itself.
Polyvance offers a wide range of cutting burrs
for both air die grinders and for electric Dremel tools.
These burrs are designed for cutting plastic
quickly so you can start welding as soon as possible.
The carbide cutting burrs make quick work of your
v-grooves, and the drum sanders for your Dremel tool
are great for preparing and
finishing mounting holes and headlight tabs.
A custom-fit dust cover from Polyvance will keep your nitrogen welder protected when you’re not using it.
The optional 6074 Accessory Shelf mounts to
the top of your welder
and provides lots of extra space to hold tools and accessories.
It folds away when not in use for ease of storage.
Polyvance also makes refinishing materials
like plastic cleaners, flexible fillers, adhesion promoters,
high-build waterborne primer-surfacers,
and specialty paints like our Flextex VT texture coating.
Go to the Polyvance website to learn more
about all the products that will make your
plastic repair process easier and faster.
Polyvance is the only company in the industry
focused exclusively on plastic repair and refinishing.
We have the experience, products, and training resources
to help you make better and more profitable plastic repairs.
Thank you for allowing Polyvance to help you.
Rigorous quality checks are performed at the
Polyvance factory
to ensure the welders are fully functional and complete before they are packaged for shipping.
However, if there is an unforeseen problem,
we’ve included a troubleshooting section in the welder’s
Quick Start Guide to help you
diagnose the issue.
If your welder won’t turn on, check that the
power supply you have the welder plugged into
is putting out 120 volts.
Make sure your power strip is on.
Make sure that all the cords are plugged in
all the way.
Finally, check the fuse on the back of the welder.
Pop it out of the fuse holder and check the
continuity across the fuse with an ohmmeter.
If the fuse is blown, you will also need to
identify the root cause.
Call Polyvance technical support for assistance.
If your nitrogen welder is not getting hot enough, check that your nitrogen flow is about 12 liters per minute
and that the temperature is
set at about 7 or 8.
At this setting, it should get hot enough to gloss over polypropylene in about three to five seconds.
Normally if the welder is not getting hot
enough, it’s because the flow is set too high
and the temperature hasn’t been increased accordingly.
If the nitrogen welder doesn’t get hot at
all, and the green light is glowing, it’s
most likely you have a burned-out heating element.
Unplug the welder, then remove the heating
element from the handle.
Check the resistance of the element across
the two pins — it should be about 26 ohms.
If your multimeter shows open circuit, the
element is burned out and needs to be replaced.
If the element shows 26 ohms and still doesn’t
get hot, call Polyvance for technical support.
If your airless welder does not get hot, check
the resistance of the heating element
using an ohmmeter across the two pins on the plug.
It should read about 53 ohms.
Again, if it reads open circuit, the ceramic heating core inside the airless element will need to be replaced.
For any other problems, call Polyvance at
800-633-3047
between 7 AM and 4 PM Central time for immediate help.
Since 1981, Polyvance has been committed to
providing the best customer service
and technical support possible with a live human being answering the phone to give you immediate assistance.

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