5 Ways Quality Control Inspectors Use QC Checklists

5 Ways Quality Control Inspectors Use QC Checklists


The most important document QC staff use to
inspect a product is the quality control,
or QC, checklist.
QC checklists serve as a guide for your inspector
during inspection, providing details related
to product requirements, on-site testing,
packaging and more.
As an importer, if you omit any important
details from the checklist, the results could
be inaccurate and you may need to re-inspect.
Let’s look at the five main ways that inspectors
use QC checklists in the field.
1.
Pulling a random sample
QC checklists often specify how many units
inspectors should randomly pull in a sample
for inspection.
Using the correct sample size ensures the
results fairly represent the quality and status
of the total shipment.
If inspectors pull too many units, this increases
the time needed for inspection and will raise
your costs if your inspectors bill you based
on time.
If inspectors pull too few units, this limits
the scope of inspection and increases the
likelihood that defects and other issues may
be overlooked.
2.
Checking the product against specifications
Inspectors typically use your checklist to
verify a number of specific characteristics
related to the product.
Some examples are product weight & dimensions,
material & construction, item color, item
marking & labeling and general appearance.
Any product requirements you’ve omitted
from your checklist likely won’t be checked
during inspection.
3.
Verifying packaging requirements
Inspectors often use the QC checklist as a
guide for checking product packaging.
Characteristics such as the appropriate type
of cardboard, packing & assortment method
and packaging labeling are all important checks
during most inspections.
It may seem excessive to include these details
in a checklist.
But incorrect packaging can lead to your product
being damaged during transit or refused at
customs.
4.
Classifying and reporting quality defects
QC professionals typically classify defects
as “critical”, “major” or “minor”
in order of severity.
For example, you might consider untrimmed
threads in a garment to be a minor defect,
while a needle left in a garment would be
critical.
Inspectors often refer to the QC checklist
for guidance on how to classify and report
any defects found during inspection.
Your tolerance for more serious defects will
probably be lower than that for less serious
defects.
So you may receive inaccurate results if your
inspectors incorrectly group the defects they
find.
5.
Performing on-site product tests
Many products require on-site testing during
inspection to determine whether they meet
safety, performance and function requirements.
Inspectors follow the QC checklist to determine
which tests to conduct, the procedures & equipment
needed and your pass or fail tolerances for
each test.
And inspectors following an incomplete checklist
are likely to perform testing incorrectly
or misinterpret the result.
In closing, inspectors largely rely on a checklist
for the relevant instructions for checking
your product.
And if effective, a QC checklist can help
lower your costs by preventing unnecessary
repeat inspections and catching any quality
defects before your shipment leaves the factory.
Be sure to download our free eBook, 5 Essentials
of a QC Checklist, by clicking the link in
the description.
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