2017 Honda CR-V Quick Drive | Consumer Reports

2017 Honda CR-V Quick Drive | Consumer Reports


[CLICK] [MUSIC PLAYING] The redesign for
2017 Honda CR-V shows that if you want to
stay on top, sometimes you have to be willing to
make some pretty big changes. Honda typically has
been conservative when passing from one CR-V
generation to the next. But that’s not enough anymore
to battle red-hot, small SUV competitors. The CR-V fights the Toyota
RAV4 and the Ford Escape that top the sales charts. So this time, the
CR-V makes a big leap from the outgoing model. But they’re not exactly
jumping into the unknown. It turns out that
the CR-V shares an awful lot with the
Honda Civic– itself between more
upscale and athletic in its latest redesign. To start, most CR-Vs get
a version of the 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder
found in the Civic. Here, it makes 190 horsepower. That turbo provides more
torque at lower engine speeds than the base engine found
in the basic LX model. Now, that engine is a 2.4-liter
four-cylinder making 184 horsepower. And it basically carries over
from the previous generation. Either engine comes made
into a continuously variable transmission, or CVT, to
optimize fuel economy. Just like with the
Civic, Honda worked to make the CR-V more
engaging to drive. It may be more important
to more buyers. And following the lead of a
lot of other recent Hondas, Honda worked hard to make
the interior quieter, adding active
noise cancellation. That move upscale
is echoed inside. For the first time,
you can actually call CR-V interior “swanky,” at
least in this top-trim Touring. Chunks of wood trim and
fancy stitched seats add eye candy to what otherwise
is a super practical cabin. Access is about as easy as it
gets, with a nearly flat sill and tall doors that open wide. Rear seat room is enormous,
particularly for this class. And there’s plenty
of rear cargo space, helped by a rear seat that
folds completely flat. Up front, Honda thankfully
added a volume knob to their touch screen
infotainment center. But its annoying
system layout puts it behind many other
systems in ease of use. At least Apple CarPlay
and Android Auto are included with
this up-level system. The Honda takes a big
leap ahead when it comes to standard safety equipment. Important things like
forward collision warning and automatic emergency
braking comes standard on all but the base LX trim. That means about 75%
of the CR-Vs Honda sell will come with this
important safety equipment. That said, we wish it was
standard on all of them, just like it is
on a Toyota RAV4. EX and higher trims
of the CR-V also have standard blind spot
monitoring, adaptive cruise control, automatic high beams,
dual-zone automatic climate control, a moonroof,
a power driver’s seat with four-way lumbar, and the
more complicated touch screen radio. That’s a lot of stuff. The EXL model adds
leather, a power liftgate, and a power passenger seat. While the top-trim Touring
adds more noise insulation, LED headlights, and
standard factory navigation. All of this makes the CR-V
a very tempting competitor in the small SUV wars. For more on SUVs, check
out consumerreports.org. [CLICK]

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